Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Wikimedia

Two words from the presidential campaign linger into the early days of the Trump administration: "the wall." 

The president continues to talk of strengthening security on the border with Mexico, and addresses it directly in an executive order from January 25th.  

That order also includes wording about rounding up people who have already entered the United States illegally.  

People like Ricardo Lujan, a Southern Oregon University student who was brought into the U.S. at age 9.  

Wikimedia

"Composer" usually implies music, and Ashland resident Webster Young has written plenty of that. 

But he also writes books about his life as a composer, including a new one called The Luxuries of Unharried Time

It is a continuation of his memoirs about life in the music business, including his dismissal from music school.  We can't wait to hear that story. 

Kellyworman.com

Art reflects the times of the artist.

What will contemporary artists have to say about the age of Trump? Artist Richard Prince recently denounced his portrait of Ivanka Trump, in a case of satire doubling down on itself, or perhaps, meeting with sincerity.

We talk with artist Kelly Worman about what to make of that: art, politics and how the lines blur. Worman is a guest curator at Southern Oregon University's Schneider Museum of Art.

BLM

Thank goodness for the dry environment in the vicinity of Paisley, Oregon. 

The conditions have helped preserve evidence of possible human habitation thousands of years ago... long before the usual theories about the first humans in North America. 

Dennis Jenkins at the University of Oregon has supervised many digs at the Paisley Caves, and now he reports on the finding of very old horse bones found there.  Dr. Jenkins shares the microphone in this month's edition of "Underground History." 

Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup

Check out the web page of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and click on the markers for recent earthquakes.

You'll be surprised to see that they happen all the time... it's just that few of them are strong enough for us to feel. 

The Cascadia Subduction Zone in which we live poses a constant threat of big earthquakes, and other features can also contribute to powerful Earth movements. 

Seismic Network president John Vidale lectures this week at Southwestern Oregon Community College on temblors in the Northwest. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

Our once-in-a-while opinion round robin gets a new name for the new year: TWO CENTS DAY. 

It's a nod to a more positive kind of discussion, not just the stream of heated consciousness implied by the old name, VENTSday. 

The first time out of the gate, we invite you to join some of the people in last weekend's womens' marches.  We asked several of them why they attended, and what their signs said. 

Whether you did, did not, or would not march, give us your two cents at 800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

White House Photo Office/Wikimedia

Journalist Matt Taibbi won't win any friends at the White House with the title of his latest book: Insane Clown President

But then Taibbi, a Rolling Stone contributor, is not known for his diplomacy, just a call-it-like-I-see-it attitude in his writing. 

He rewinds the tape of the 2016 election campaign in all its grace and glory, examining the moves, countermoves, and just plain dumb luck that resulted in the November outcome. 

PGHolbrook/Wikimedia Commons

A flurry of federal environmental protections took place in the waning days of the Obama administration. 

In addition to the much-publicized expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, 100,000 acres of headwaters of the Smith River and other streams were withdrawn from possible mining by an action of the Interior Department. 

It is not a permanent block, though it would likely be a long time before mining interests were able to work their claims. 

The Kalmiopsis Audubon Society is one of several groups that pushed for the mineral withdrawal. 

Google Streetview

The Southern Oregon Historical Society is trying not to become history itself.

SOHS was once funded by property taxes, but a change in law allowed its levy money to be redirected, and it was. 

The organization has struggled since then, with programs and staff cut to a bare minimum. 

Staff is now all-volunteer.  And a tax levy to create a historic preservation district failed in the November election. 

SSgt Alesia Goosic/U.S. Navy/Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22686562

The doctor arrives in the exam room after you've waited a while. 

And it's great that she's finally here, but is she really present? 

Doctors are thoroughly trained, but they also have to work like the rest of us to make sure they're present in the moment. 

Ronald Epstein, a doctor himself, writes about mindfulness in medicine in his book Attending. It includes examples of doctors who have (and have not) stepped up when the moment demanded.

Jon Sullivan

It's becoming a regular part of the Dungeness crab season on the West Coast: waiting for domoic acid levels to drop into safe ranges. 

When they're up, the crab fishery is closed to protect human health.  It's open now, after a delay.

Oregon State researcher Morgaine McKibben looked into the ocean conditions that appear to contribute to the rise in domoic acid, which is a neurotoxin. 

The work McKibben and five other researchers produced is published in a scientific journal

pulsepoint.org

A friend collapses, complaining of chest pain.  You reach for the phone, call 911, and activate an app that finds people nearby who know CPR. 

This is not science fiction, it is an existing app called Pulsepoint

Emergency medical crews in Jackson County are embracing Pulsepoint as a way to get medical help to heart attack patients faster.  The program launches in Jackson County February 1st.

revolutionwhereyoulive.org

Talk of revolution breaks over the American consciousness in waves every so often, maybe more often just before and after elections. 

Yes! Magazine co-founder Sarah Van Gelder, who practices "solutions journalism," took a cross-country trip to find people who are already changing the country and the way it does business, one local effort at a time. 

The result is Van Gelder's book The Revolution Where You Live, detailing her odyssey from the Northwest to the East Coast and back. 

From downtrodden Newark and Detroit to the Bakken oil field and Montana coal country, there's a lot going on. 

Snow is coming down on mountain passes in the region. 

The following school districts have announced schedule changes for today.

  • Schools in the Mount Shasta Union School District: Mount Shasta Elementary and Sisson Schools will start at 10am.

EPA

The Oregon Environmental Council is a non-partisan non-profit focused on the environmental health of living things in Oregon.  That's rather like the mission of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. 

But OEC is concerned with President-Elect Trump's choice to head the EPA, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt.  Pruitt is a climate change denier who has taken the EPA to court on several occasions. 

OEC's Deputy Director, Chris Hagerbaumer, has many stories to tell about environmental successes in Oregon and how she hopes they'll continue under new EPA leadership. 

Elvert Barnes, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53062041

Not long after Donald Trump walks into the White House, plenty of other Americans will be walking. 

The Women's March on Washington will draw thousands of women to the capital to show resistance to the Trump administration. 

Many smaller marches are planned for communities across the country, including a march set for Ashland on Saturday. 

What drives the desire to march?  We have two people to ask: Sharon Dohrmann, a co-organizer, and Teresa Cisneros, a featured speaker. 

Wikimedia

We all lose someone to death sometime.  That knowledge does not really help with the grief, though. 

Words of comfort can... the kind that Ashland's Susanne Severeid offers in her book When Someone You Love is Dying

Her own experience with her husband's death inspired Severeid to provide the book of prose and nature photographs. 

Chris Darling/Wikimedia

The child foster care system can't seem to stay out of the news for long. 

The very concept of foster care comes with some issues: removing children from their homes and putting them in the care of strangers.  Tweaks and overhauls come about from time to time, but some issues remain. 

The court appointed special advocate--CASA--system is designed to keep another set of eyes on kids in foster care, and the voluntary system is always looking for new volunteers. 

CASA of Siskiyou County is one of many such programs around the country, and we learn more about the system in this interview. 

Friends of Cascade-Siskiyou

The news from Washington was expected, but it came with a surprise. 

President Obama did indeed decide to expand the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Jackson, Klamath, and Siskiyou Counties.  But the expansion, 47,000 acres or so, did not double the footprint of the existing monument. 

Just the same, pro-monument groups hailed the decision and anti-expansion groups criticized it. 

dianacoogle.blogspot.com

Longtime listeners of Jefferson Public Radio will remember the name of Diana Coogle.

She provided commentary for years on an afternoon news magazine program JPR once ran. 

Her capacity for observing and remarking on the world around her remains undiminished.  In fact, she recently finished a new work, a book called Wisdom of the Heart, combining her prose with the painting of fellow Applegate resident Barbara Kostal. 

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