Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson more than three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Southern Oregon Digital Archive

The voice may sound familiar: Diana Coogle delivered audio essays on JPR News for years. 

Now she's back to talk about her own life story, as it involves a commune, Houkola, in the Colestin Valley by the state line. 

That story is the focus of this month's Stories of Southern Oregon, compiled and curated by Maureen Flanagan Battistella. 

Adrián Cerón/Wikimedia

The idea of our wounded younger selves continuing to haunt us into adulthood was brought up years ago by many experts on the mind.  So by now, the idea of an "inner child" should sound familiar. 

Therapist Susan Anderson is more concerned with another part of us, the OUTER child. 

She writes of the issues raised, and how to deal with them, in Taming Your Outer Child: Overcoming Self-Sabotage and Healing from Abandonment

Forest Service/Public Domain

Rivers are powerful things, in the physical world and in our imaginations. 

But do you really understand where rivers come from and how their courses are set?  Sean W. Fleming, a geoscientist and a bit of a poet, considers rivers both as bodies of water and as metaphors. 

Fleming's book is Where the River Flows: Scientific Reflections on Earth's Waterways

Signals & Noise & New Building & VR

Jul 6, 2018

It seems appropriate that we have a robust discussion of the media in JPR's brand-new home. 

Monday, July 9th, will be the first day in the long-awaited (49 years) history of JPR broadcasting from someplace OTHER than a basement.  And our friends from the Communications faculty at Southern Oregon University return for this month's edition of Signals & Noise. 

Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi will discuss items in a broad range of media, from virtual reality to books.  In fact, we plan to use a VR camera to record this first live segment in the new place. 

National Archives of The Netherlands

The first world war was unimaginable for many people.  Then it happened again, just a generation later. 

How did Europe, considered the center of civilization, devolve into belligerence and barbarity TWICE in such a short amount of time? 

The Penguin History of Europe series asked that question, and historian Ian Kershaw answered, in To Hell and Back: Europe 1914-1949

Oregon DOT

Updated July 6, 9:11 a.m. Pacific Time

One person has died in Siskiyou County during the Klamathon Fire, reports CalFire. The agency has not released a name as it investigates the incident and notifies the person's relatives.  

Colorado Public Radio

July can be the hottest month of the year, in several senses of the word. 

Even if the weather does not produce totally scorching days, the arts scene is cooking with numerous events, many of them outdoors. 

Our First Friday Arts segment scans the landscape for events on stages and in galleries throughout the region. 

And it's ALL listener-generated content. 

What we put on the air on First Friday is the phone calls we receive.  Put an event on the table (and on the air) by calling 800-838-3760. 

Wikimedia

The 1960s came and went, but the spirit stayed in the woods of Lane County. 

It is there, in the woods near Veneta, that the Oregon Country Fair keeps the spirit alive with its extended weekend, July 13-15. 

The feel of the counter-culture is recreated at OCF, with everything from vaudeville to body painting.  Charlie Ruff is the former GM of the fair, and still a dedicated fan. 

CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4095637

Neurons, axons, dendrites, synapses... you remember the terminology of nerve cells from school, maybe.  Marjorie Hines Woollacott, emeritus professor at the University of Oregon, knows it forwards and backwards. 

As a neuroscientist, she knew the physical entity of the human brain completely.  But it wasn't until she began meditating that she began to think beyond the physical constraints of the mind. 

She explores the topic in the book Infinite Awareness

Ryan Russell Studios via McConnell Foundation

Downtown Redding will look very different in just a few years.  Between a brand-new Shasta County courthouse and some other projects in the works, something like $200 million will be spent on new construction in the heart of the city.

It's exciting news for the Redding Chamber of Commerce, which itself moved downtown just last year. 

The Redding-based McConnell Foundation put some money into the makeover. 

Just when you think Washington, DC can't get any more exciting, a Supreme Court justice retires and roils the town. 

Anthony Kennedy's departure and replacement is the hot topic in the Senate, which will confirm the replacement. 

Democrats have little say in the process, but they do have opinions.  Both of Oregon's senators (and California's) are Democrats; Sen. Ron Wyden offers his perspective in a swing through Southern Oregon. 

One point: Wyden says not all power resides in Washington. 

kellepics/Pixabay

Would you, at six years of age, even recognize the person you are now?  We all go through profound changes in a typical lifetime. 

The normal processes of life--working, loving, eating, bearing children, sleeping--transform us over time.  And that's in addition to things we do to ourselves, like weight-lifting and dieting and getting tattoos. 

Gavin Francis, physician and author, considers the many things that happen to bodies in a book called Shape Shifters

lungtheband.com

Josh Gross has a passion for music.  Safe to say that Josh loves music in many forms, and he gets to demonstrate it by making his own AND by covering the music of others in his writing. 

We plug Josh into the Exchange once a month in a segment we call Rogue Sounds. 

Harris.news/Wikimedia

Celebrate America's birthday!  We will, by taking the day off and putting the Exchange on autopilot.  And that means a review of some of our important segments from the past. 

At 8: Bryan Burrough gives a look back at a tough time in American history in his book Days of Rage: America’s Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

At 9: Alice Randall gave us a slave's perspective on Gone With the Wind with a parody called The Wind Done Gone

She and daughter Caroline Randall Williams teamed up for a cookbook with stories of their family and updated (as in less-fatty) recipes called Soul Food Love

Wikimedia

Getting good dental care in a rural area can be a real problem. 

First, dentists are in short supply.  Second, money tends to be in short supply, so even if the dentists were there, many rural residents still could not afford to go to the. 

We explore the problem of quality rural dental care and its consequences on overall health. 

Bruce Austin is the dental director for the Oregon Health Authority, and Sean Boynes is with the DentaQuest Institute

CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1240671

Twice in recent weeks, Oregon groups working to get gun-control measures on the ballot had to retreat. 

Pro-gun groups took the measures to court, delaying the collection of signatures.  The measure supporters opted not to try collecting signatures in a very short period of time before a deadline. 

One of the measures would have created a law to require safe storage of guns. 

Oregonians for Safe Gun Storage have not given up on their quest. 

Wikimedia/Public Domain

Quick, name some of the fabulously rich men of the 19th century.  John D. Rockefeller?  Check.  Andrew Carnegie?  Check.  John W. Mackay?  Uh, who? 

Not a household name in our time, but John Mackay got rich in the Comstock Lode of silver and gold in Nevada, and went toe-to-toe in competition with some of the richest men of his time. 

Gregory Crouch profiles Mackay (pronounced "Mackie") in the book The Bonanza King: John Mackay and the Battle Over the Greatest Riches in the American West

https://www.oregon.gov/newsroom/Pages/NewsDetail.aspx?newsid=2737

The plan for a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant for Jordan Cove, near Coos Bay, is rolling further into regulatory review. 

The plan, resurrected after an earlier federal denial, requires a pipeline crossing the region from North Bend to the Klamath Falls area. 

State agencies make up a piece of the regulatory puzzle, and a comment period is now open on whether the state should issue a water quality permit. 

Michael Hinrichs is a spokesperson for the project. 

https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19986334

Run a car engine with the muffler off, and you realize the violence going on in there. 

An internal combustion engine features a lot of--wait for it--combustion.  There are many explosions (okay, controlled burns) every second.  And those make heat that the cooling system has to carry away. 

So what goes on in the radiator and tubing, and what can (and does) go wrong?  Ashland Automotive owner Zach Edwards joins us for another edition of The Squeaky Wheel. 

If you like wine but think "oenophile" is something you use to trim your nails, we've got a book for you. 

Kathleen Bershad helps wine wannabes get their act together in The Wine Lover's Apprentice: Words of Wisdom for Would-Be Oenophiles

It's a chance for people who like wine but don't know much about it to get a grasp on the tools, the tastes, the terroir, and more. 

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