Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

oregon.gov

  Oregon's Elliott State Forest is supposed to bring in money--through timber sales--for the state's common school fund. 

But there's not much logging, and the forest actually costs the state money now. 

So the state Land Board is looking for ways to up the income and/or logging, or at least cut the deficits. 

Penguin Books

  Go ahead, click that link below.  It's got to be safe, right? 

Nobody would deliberately cause harm to you on the Internet, after all.  If only that were true. 

So much of what appears on the Internet is NOT true, or at least not currently. 

Mathematician/science journalist/watchdog Charles Seife looks at the situation in his book Virtual Unreality: The New Era of Digital Deception.

Wikimedia

Depending on how you measure it, Oregon's high school graduation rate is either the worst in the country, or just near the bottom. 

Neither version provides any solace for educational leaders, who clearly have some work to do. 

Nancy Golden is Oregon's Chief Education Officer, responsible for a system now aimed at education from birth to career. 

Wikimedia

Police tell us frequently how often they respond to calls that really should involve mental health professionals.  Which begs the question: is there an increase in mental illness? 

This is a question considered by the journalist Bob Whitaker, the head of the organization Mad In America

His reporting raises questions about mental illness generally and specifically about the use and reliability of psychiatric drugs. 

Whitaker plans a workshop in the Rogue Valley next month, sponsored by the Mental Health Resource and Education Network

Hachette Books

If we know a great deal about our enemies, we can beat them in war. 

Especially if we know exactly where they are. 

Military expert William Arkin says these are common lines of thought among warriors, and he finds big problems with them in Unmanned: Drones, Data, and the Illusion of Perfect Warfare

Arkin's book looks at current approaches to military intelligence and hardware--primarily drones--and finds them working against their intentions. 

University of Oregon

Fractals, those mathematical patterns, are fun to look at. 

And they may also help people with the ABILITY to look. 

University of Oregon physicist Richard Taylor was just awarded a patent for a fractal-based implant designed to help blind people see. 

Oregon may double its bottle deposit to a dime, but some people think it's time to do away with bottle returns. 

Let's hear what you think about that, and about the current state of affairs in the race for president, in this week's VENTSday. 

Why should the politicians and activists have all the fun?  You've got opinions on events in the news, too.  And our VENTSday segment is designed to let the world hear them. 

We plop a pair of topics on the table--frequently unrelated--and let YOU deliver your passionate (and polite) views on them. 

Tarcher/Penguin

Plenty of memoirists join us on the Exchange, sharing stories we might not have heard otherwise. 

But you don't need the title "memoirist" to tell your own story. 

That is precisely the point of Alan Gelb's book Having The Last Say: Capturing Your Legacy in One Small Story

Even if you don't think of yourself as a writer and never will, there are tips in the book to assembling a coherent story or set of stories from your own life. 

Courtesy Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The Bard has been dead for 400 years, but the offerings of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival are hardly stuck in the past. Living playwrights also grace the stages of this Ashland institution.

JPR’s Geoffrey Riley sits down with playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes  whose play "The Happiest Song Plays Last" is now at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

   

                      

Wikimedia

The end of container service at the Port of Portland may sound at first like a story affecting just the Portland area. 

But the port says ships carried containers going to and from 31 of Oregon's 36 counties, affecting exports and imports across the state. 

The Agriculture Transportation Coalition, the State of Oregon and other entities are hosting workshops across the state, to help importers and exporters find solutions that do not involve shipping out of Portland. 

Wikimedia

Peninsula Airways out of Alaska generally goes by the name PenAir these days. 

Air travelers in Klamath Falls and Crescent City are not about to quibble with the name, because PenAir has agreed to fly to those airports. 

This will bring commercial flights back to Klamath Falls for the first time in a year. 

Simon & Schuster

The Oregon Trail's role in the westward expansion of the United States is beyond dispute. 

But that's different from actually recreating the journey in today's world. 

Who'd want to, with the long, dusty days, the chilly nights, the lack of water and creature comforts? 

Rinker Buck, that's who.  And the writer even convinced his brother to join him for a journey retracing the Trail, from Missouri to Oregon. 

It's all in his book The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey

Wikimedia

Police and mental illness... not an ideal combination, but one that happens all the time. 

And it turned ugly last month in Eugene. 

Police arrested a woman who tried to protect her son, reported to be having an episode of mental illness, from police.  The woman's brother happens to be Eric Richardson, the president of the Lane County chapter of the NAACP

He has taken his condemnation of the incident public, while police point to an ongoing issue with officers having to respond to people dealing with mental illness. 

Penguin Books

In the days before Las Vegas went upscale, with big fountains and hotels that replicate foreign cities, there was Binion's Horseshoe. 

It got a reputation as the noisiest and rowdiest casino in downtown Vegas. 

Benny Binion started the place after the police chased him out of Dallas. 

Binion's rise from thug to mogul is told in Blood Aces: The Wild Ride of Benny Binion, the Texas Gangster Who Created Vegas Poker

Facebook

August is already a week old, but there are major arts events still to come. 

The West Coast Country Music Festival returns to the Greensprings near Ashland in the middle of the month. 

The New Autonomous Folksingers visit our studio for songs and info about the fest, as part of our First Friday Arts segment. 

Music, theater, dance and more are celebrated on First Friday.

Friends of Civic Stadium

Fans of Civic Stadium in Eugene had grand plans for the old baseball park, vacant for years. 

The plans turned to ashes when the stadium grandstand burned to the ground in late June. 

But feelings about Civic run deep, and something may yet emerge, phoenix-like, from the ashes. 

Penguin Books

The world had only three days to get used to the idea of nuclear weapons... when the second bomb dropped. 

It's been 70 years nearly to the day since an American atom bomb exploded over Nagasaki, Japan. 

And plenty of survivors are still around to talk about that day. 

Susan Southard talked to five of them about that day and the present day, for her book Nagasaki

Wikimedia

The opponents of the Jordan Cove liquified natural gas (LNG) export terminal and pipeline are willing to go a long way to press their case.  232 miles, in fact. 

Pipeline opponents plan to "Hike The Pipe" later this summer, walking the entire length of the proposed pipeline route from the Klamath Basin to Coos Bay. 

They are collecting permissions from landowners and donations from supporters for the walk, scheduled for August 22nd through September 26th. 

weebly.com

Don Crossfield retired from teaching full-time three years ago. 

And people still can't stop thanking him for his work, and rewarding it. 

The former Roseburg High School math teacher (he still subs) recently picked up an award from the Oregon Council of Teachers of Mathematics for his years of making his subject matter crystal-clear to students. 

Penguin Books

"I think, therefore I am."  Rene Descartes said it succinctly, but nearly 400 years later, we still struggle to fully comprehend the idea of SELF. 

If we change physically, does that mean we change ourselves? 

Before you attempt to answer, listen as we talk to Anil Ananthaswamy about his brand-new book The Man Who Wasn't There: Investigations Into the Strange New Science of Self

Pages