Gail Fiorini-Jenner

As It Was Contributor

Gail Fiorini-Jenner of Etna, California, is a writer and teacher married to fourth-generation cattle rancher Doug Jenner. They have three children, seven grandchildren and live on the original homestead.  Her first novel Across the Sweet Grass Hills, won the 2002 WILLA Literary Award. She co-authored four histories with Arcadia Publishing: Western Siskiyou County: Gold & Dreams, Images of the State of JeffersonThe State of Jefferson: Then & Now, which placed in the 2008 Next Generation Awards for Nonfiction and Postcards from the State of Jefferson.  She co-authored Historic Inns & Eateries in the State of Jefferson, featuring 30 locations and their recipes. Fiorini-Jenner has placed in several writing contests: The Jack London Novel Contest; The William Faulkner Story Contest; The Writer's Digest Inspirational Story and Screenplay Contests. She appeared on History Channel's  How the States Got Their Shapes,  and NPR's West Coast Live. She also writes for Jefferson Backroads.  

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History
2:41 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Charles Maplesden Recalls His Father’s Blacksmithing Skills

Charles Maplesden was born in 1916, son of blacksmith Charlie Maplesden and his wife, Verna, of Etna, Calif.  The family moved to Greenview where the father opened a blacksmith shop.

Charles recalled that his father was so strong that when shoeing a draft horse he would “hold onto [its] forefoot while it reared up on its hind legs. He wouldn’t let go but held the weight of the horse as it thrashed about…when he let go, the animal seemed glad to stand quietly.”

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History
1:00 am
Wed October 1, 2014

Fire Rushes through Etna, Calif., in 1896

 

“The cry of fire was sounded at about 1:30 o’clock this morning,” the Scott Valley County Reporter newspaper wrote on March 16, 1896.  “It aroused the slumbering people of the town (of Etna, Calif.), who, half awake and half clad, rushed from all directions on to Main Street to find that Mrs. Mani’s hotel and saloon building was in flames and past all hope of being saved.”

Quickly the flames consumed more wooden buildings, including Emmel Miller’s brick store and the Odd Fellows Hall.

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History
1:00 am
Wed October 1, 2014

Fire Rushes through Etna, Calif., in 1896

 

“The cry of fire was sounded at about 1:30 o’clock this morning,” the Scott Valley County Reporter newspaper wrote on March 16, 1896.  “It aroused the slumbering people of the town (of Etna, Calif.), who, half awake and half clad, rushed from all directions on to Main Street to find that Mrs. Mani’s hotel and saloon building was in flames and past all hope of being saved.”

Quickly the flames consumed more wooden buildings, including Emmel Miller’s brick store and the Odd Fellows Hall.

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History
2:24 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Hog Fire of 1987 Scorches 260,000 Acres in Northern California

 There are forest fires … and there are forest fires.  The Hog Fire of 1987 especially comes to mind in Northern California.  

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History
2:24 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Fire of 1871 Destroys Yreka, Calif.

 Yreka, Calif., suffered terribly in what is known as the “great fire of 1871.”  It was the same year as the disastrous Chicago fire, and for residents it became a landmark in time.

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History
2:17 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Hayfork, Calif., Figures Prominently through Time

  Hayfork, Calif., is off the beaten path, but with a population of only 2,400 it ranks as the second largest town in Northern California’s Trinity County. Settled in 1851 during the California Gold Rush, it was first known as Kingsbury or Kingsberrys, then South Fork, followed by Hay Town.  It became Hayfork in 1854, its name derived from the hay and food grains produced along the North Fork of the South Fork of the Trinity River.

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History
3:06 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Railroad Town Serves Lumber Industry

 Gold rush miners settled many towns in Siskiyou County, Calif., but not the little town of Tailholt, born in 1888 to serve the lumber industry. It was positioned at the end of the railroad in Shasta Valley, on the east side of today’s Interstate 5. At least a dozen lumber mills existed where present-day Ball Mountain Road is located. 

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History
3:47 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Strawberry Valley Joins School District

 The history of Strawberry Valley schools in Siskiyou County, Calif., began with official district recognition in 1870.

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History
10:55 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Happy Camp Builds California's First Log High School

 The townspeople of Happy Camp, Calif., realized in the 1920s that they needed a high school in the remote and rugged location.

 With the closest school 65 miles away in Fort Jones, most students never advanced past eighth grade. Parents, led by Gorham Humphreys, sought help from the Siskiyou Union High School District.  For a time, students gathered with a single teacher in one room at the elementary school. By 1933, the community looked for a new location.

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History
11:48 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Stars Escape from Little Shasta Girl's Bag

  Northern California’s Shasta Tribe has shared many early tales of the region.  One relates how a little girl accidentally scattered stars across the sky.

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History
10:34 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Redding's Sundial Bridge Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

 This summer marks the tenth anniversary of the Sundial Bridge in Redding, Calif. The celebration will culminate on July 4th, the actual anniversary of the stunning architectural superstructure.

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History
10:53 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Plane Crashes on Montague's First Airfield

 The first landing strip at Montague, Calif., was an open field south of Little Shasta Road. It had a large board with a white-canvass cross that guided pilots to safe landings. 

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History
10:42 am
Wed June 25, 2014

The Historic Requa Inn Takes Name from Fish Cannery Center

 The Historic Requa Inn is located in Klamath, Calif., one mile from the ocean and less than 100 yards from the Klamath River.  Originally it was called the Pioneer Inn and was built in the mid-1880s, but that structure burned in 1913. The following year, a new hotel called the Klamath Inn was built by W. T. Bailey. The inn flourished for many years until the local commercial fishing industry closed down in 1933.  The inn was bought and sold over the years and in 1985 Paul and Donna Hamby restored and reopened it in 1986.  Again it was sold in 2002 to David and Barbara Gross who officially renamed it the Historic Requa Inn after the original town of Requa, a fish cannery center on the river in the 1800s. A hotel for more than 100 years, the Requa is the only historic lodging located in the center of the Redwood National Park. Originally a 22-bed hotel, it now has10 rooms, all with private baths.  It has been included on the National Geographic Traveler’s “Stay List,” a collection of 129 so-called “We Love” hotels in North America.

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History
10:39 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Lewiston's Historic District Includes Hotel Rebuilt in 1875

 The historic mining town of Lewiston, Calif., with a population today of about 1,500, is located along Hwy 299 and the Trinity River.  The highway connects Redding to Weaverville and ultimately, the Coast. 
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History
8:08 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Charles Kappler of France Brews Beer in Etna, Calif.

 Born in Alsace, France, in 1834, Charles Kappler emigrated to Yreka, Calif., in 1860, where he worked in a brewery.  

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History
10:29 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Crossing Scott Mountain Requires Grit in early 1860s

 The toughest mountain to cross for the California-Oregon Stage Company was Scott Mountain.

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History
9:37 am
Mon May 12, 2014

French-born Packer Delivers Supplies to Siskiyou County

Gus Meamber spent most of his life in Siskiyou County as a packer.  With no roads along the Klamath or Scott River, pack trains were essential for getting supplies to miners, merchants, and farmers.

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History
8:18 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Chinese Operate Successful Gold Mines in Siskiyou County

 Chinese mining companies were rare and their workers often persecuted during the California gold rush, but a number of operations were successful in Siskiyou County. During the late 1800s along the Klamath River, Chinese worked for white miners or ran their own mining companies. 
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History
9:33 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Barns and Watering Troughs Serve as 1880s Billboards

 Barns and watering troughs served as billboards in the 1880s, proof that advertising was as much a part of life in those days as railroading and road building.
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History
8:17 am
Thu April 3, 2014

John Daggett Develops Black Bear Gold Mine

  Discovered in 1860, the Black Bear Mine was one of the most important quartz gold mines in Siskiyou County, Calif.  It was located along the Salmon River in the Liberty Mining District, nine miles south of Sawyer’s Bar. 
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