Gail Fiorini-Jenner

As It Was Contributor

Gail Fiorini-Jenner of Etna, California, is a writer and teacher married to fourth-generation cattle rancher Doug Jenner. They have three children, seven grandchildren and live on the original homestead.  Her first novel Across the Sweet Grass Hills, won the 2002 WILLA Literary Award. She co-authored four histories with Arcadia Publishing: Western Siskiyou County: Gold & Dreams, Images of the State of JeffersonThe State of Jefferson: Then & Now, which placed in the 2008 Next Generation Awards for Nonfiction and Postcards from the State of Jefferson.  She co-authored Historic Inns & Eateries in the State of Jefferson, featuring 30 locations and their recipes. Fiorini-Jenner has placed in several writing contests: The Jack London Novel Contest; The William Faulkner Story Contest; The Writer's Digest Inspirational Story and Screenplay Contests. She appeared on History Channel's  How the States Got Their Shapes,  and NPR's West Coast Live. She also writes for Jefferson Backroads.  

The early settlers of Yreka quickly learned to fear fire and its catastrophic effects.

William D. Mathews Sr. was born in Fort Jones, Calif., to Israel S. and Ann Mathews—both early pioneers of Siskiyou County.  William’s father was one of the earliest pioneers to enter Scott Valley.

It wasn’t easy to establish a newspaper in the early days of the gold rush.

Beginning in early 1853, a group of men in Yreka, Calif., began organizing an Order of Odd Fellows lodge. The lofty principles of the Odd Fellows were “love [sic] friendship and truth” through “benevolence and charity … That charity that will grasp a distressed brother’s hand …(and)… warm into life his sinking and feinting [sic] spirits … infuse new hopes, fresh courage, and inspire him to go forth and renew the battle of life …”

First established in 1871, the Bogus School in Siskiyou County, Calif., has closed and reopened several times. Saleen Heckle was an early teacher during the 1899-1900 term.

The Snowden School District was located along the right-hand side of the Montague-Ager Road north of Montague, Calif.

Between the 1850’s and 60’s, the former settlement of Petersburg, Calif., was the largest mining town along the 16-mile stretch of the South Fork of Salmon River between Abrams at Big Flat and Cecilville.

Even as a small boy growing up in northern Siskiyou County near the town of Ager, Charles Cooley had his own horse.

It may seem that married women from pioneer days had limited opportunities, as most independent businesswomen were either single or widowed.

Shasta, often referred to as “Old Shasta,” faced plenty of petty and violent crime in the 1850’s as it grew into one of the most important gold rush towns in Northern California.

Miners named Benton and Roades discovered gold in 1893 along the creek running through Harrison Gulch, 50 miles from Redding, Calif.

In the 1860’s, a band of Indians gave George Green Brown a bad time at his trading post on the South Fork of the Salmon River.  He had opened the post just below Cecilville during the California Gold Rush when he was 24 years old.

Discovered in the 1890's by Harvey Bowerman of Maine, the King Solomon Mine, located at the head of Matthews Creek on the South Salmon River, became one of Northern California’s major producers.

Like many other gold rush communities in Northern California, Yreka had a substantial Chinese community complete with gaming houses, shops, washhouses, butcher shops, opium dens, a hotel, and a Joss House.  Though the Chinese faced prejudice and discrimination throughout the region, sometimes the whole community came together, particularly during the annual Chinese New Year celebration.

Diaries, journals, and letters provide a glimpse into the realities of life among the early miners and settlers.  Hiram G. Ferris came West at age 24 in 1846 and settled in Yreka, Calif.  His letter home on Dec. 29, 1850, read like this:

Siskiyou County and many other areas in northern California and Southern Oregon suffered severely in the winter of 1861-62.  Every river swelled over its banks, taking out bridges and wiping out homesteads. And still the rains continued.

Mining along Greenhorn Creek south of Yreka, Calif., was very rich from the 1850’s into the early 1900’s.  It has been estimated that a five-mile stretch produced $11 million worth of gold during that time.

While mining continued into the 1860’s and beyond along the Klamath River, gold bearing quartz wasn’t discovered until the 1870’s in Rocky Gulch and the hills west of Henley in Siskiyou County. The best known of these quartz mines was the Jillson, owned by the Hazel Gold Mining Co.

In 1856, George Wohlfert emigrated from Germany to California, making his way to California and traveling north to Petersburg on the South Fork of Salmon River.

Even today people ask how Greenhorn Creek, an early mining district south of Yreka, Calif., got its name.

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