Eric Teel

Director of FM Network Programming / Music Director

After a failed attempt at structured music instruction at Washington State University, Eric found himself standing in front of the renowned Edward R. Murrow College of Communication with two full years of radio experience already under his belt. The path was clear, and the broadcast journalism degree was obtained.

Over the next 20-plus years, Eric has drawn upon his extensive music knowledge to host programs in nearly every genre for commercial and public radio. He joined the JPR staff in 1996, hosting Siskiyou Music Hall from JPR’s Redding studios. In 2002, he moved to Ashland and took over as one of the hosts of Open Air. In addition to music, he’s put his journalism background to use reporting for NPR, managing JPR's award-winning newsroom, and producing feature-length public radio specials carried nationwide.

As FM Network Program Director, Eric oversees all aspects of JPR's broadcast day. He still hosts the occasional Open Air shift, and now handles JPR’s growing series of live in-studio music performances.

When not at work (which is nearly never) he can be seen in the crowd or on stage at music events around the region, or finishing solidly mid-pack in bicycle races in an effort to make his fitter friends feel better.

Eric Teel

Hailing from Detroit, Michigan, Empty Houses is an indie pop band with a strong retro flavor that borrows from the iconic sounds of Motown and Phil Spector. The band was formed by multi-instrumentalists Dave Mackinder and Adam Mercer, both of pop-punkers Fireworks, and singer Ali Shea.

Welcome to the first Stories Alive Podcast! Each episode features original stories written by young authors, transformed into audio-theater for you to enjoy!  On this episode, you'll hear stories about all types of adventures, including going to a new school! Listen in to a lizard saving the day in "Sean and the Lawnmower," by 2nd grader Madison Sink; a girl using her special magic as she enters a new school in "Sadie's Inner Magic," by 11 year old Fiona Cutler, and the amazing adventure of "Robo Trobo and the Talking Toilets," by 1st grader, Kechoa Pech.

Over the decade and a half that Rogue Wave has made music, Zach Rogue has continued to expand his band’s emotional spectrum. Drawing inspiration from the inevitable delusions of everyday American life, Rogue, his longtime bandmate Pat Spurgeon, and their fellow members have returned reinvigorated, and with a fresh sound founded on the art of patience, the fearlessness of experimenting, and the unbridled joy of creating something meaningful to help us navigate through these vacant times.

Having written his most personal collection of songs to date, Mark Charles Heidinger initially planned to strip the recording process of Vandaveer's new album down to as few elements as possible, pursuing a more direct, minimalist approach. But after huddling with vocalist, Rose Guerin, and long-time producer, Duane Lundy, they charted a new course, enveloping these autobiographical vignettes with a full spectrum of sound. And with more than a little help from their friends. The trio called in brothers-in-arms, J. Tom Hnatow, Robby Cosenza and Justin Craig, for a prolonged session of sonic wayfinding.

On Tuesday, August 23rd, As It Was, JPR's daily series of audio vignettes on the history of southern Oregon and northern California will reach a significant milestone: 3,000 episodes!

Folk powerhouse pair The Small Glories are Cara Luft & JD Edwards, a dynamic new duo planted on the Canadian Prairies. They are a study in contrasts; Cara, all earth mother on her 21-speed bike, helmet and backpack, environmentally friendly and wholesome, ebullient and engaging; and burly JD, looking like a cross between a biker and long-haul trucker in scruffy beard, ball cap, t-shirt and jean jacket, slightly intimidating (until you meet him).

Ben Abraham's honest songwriting and disarming stage presence have seen him grow in the last two years from a well-kept hometown secret into an independent artist with a passionate international following. His distinctive soulful voice and developing reputation as a songwriter have led to recent collaborations with artists including Gotye and Sara Bareilles, and he was recently hand-picked by Emmylou Harris to support her on a national tour of Australia.

Alex Jackson was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, started playing the guitar at age 7, and spent most of the time locked in her bedroom jumping around with a guitar practicing to AC/DC records. Alex had her first live show at age 11 at The Cherry Bar - a pub on the aptly named AC/DC Lane (which is a real street in Melbourne Australia) and has been gigging, playing, and writing songs ever since.

Multi-instrumentalist Sean Watkins has long been known for his work as one-third of the Grammy Award-winning Nickel Creek and, more recently, for helming, with sister Sara, the itinerant, genre-hopping Watkins Family Hour ensemble. But in the last year he has more assertively – and impressively – taken on the role of solo artist. What To Fear is a follow-up to 2014’s acclaimed All I Do Is Lie, which had been Watkins’ first solo effort in nearly a decade, ten years that had been jammed with collaborative projects and a herculean amount of touring.

The artist formerly known as Aaron Livingston knows his nation well. The pastiche and reach of his music is literally all over the map, and he can hear a map in his music. In it, he can recognize the places he's lived, traveled, and played to, places explored and discovered. "I hear places in the songs without trying to evoke them while writing. I can trace where a lot of my music came from, as my life and my family touch so many different places. I can hear the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in my voice, the way I say some of the words; I hear New York, definitely in my lyrics. Detroit is a place I haven't spent a ton of time in, but if I explore the music of Detroit, I can hear myself in there, too."

JPR continues its coverage of Election 2016 with special coverage of the Democratic National Convention July 25-28.  The Convention special will be hosted from Philadelphia in partnership between NPR and PBS.  Coverage will include live podium speeches, interviews with newsmakers and delegates, and analysis from NPR and PBS Newshour reporters and editors inside and outside the convention.

Eric Teel

Futureman is an inventor, scientist, musician, composer and five time Grammy Award winning performer with Béla Fleck and the Flecktones, a band that also featured his bass virtuoso brother Victor. At the heart of the Flecktones' music is Futureman's ground breaking percussion technique performed on his first invention he calls the Drumitar. The guitar shaped instrument allows him to replicate sounds of an entire contemporary drum kit with just a few fingers.

JPR is once again hosting the Pre-Concert Conversations at the Britt Classical Festival. Prior to each concert, there are informal talks in Britt's new Performance Garden beginning at 7pm for those who want to learn a little more about the music and composers.

Ana Byers

Honesty, confidence, and respect permeate Eilen Jewell’s (pronounced: EE-len) music, dating back to her self-released Boundary County album in 2006. Since then, the Boise native has recorded five studio albums with her road-tested touring band, and two more as a member of the Boston-based gospel-charged Sacred Shakers, which includes that well-oiled band at its core. Her latest, Sundown Over Ghost Town, is a culmination of Jewell’s work to date.

On Thursday and Friday evenings June 30th and July 1st, JPR will broadcast a special 2-part documentary from NPR called Obama's Years.

Soleil Rowan

Entranced by the sound of her grandfather’s violin, Anna Tivel started learning in the first grade and never put it down. In 2006, she moved to Portland, muddled through college, and started waiting tables and playing some fiddle on the side. Jeffrey Martin was born in San Antonio, Texas. While he’s been writing songs since he was in high school, he didn’t begin touring until 2010 when a few chance opening gigs fell his way. Before he ever slept out of his car for music, he enjoyed sleeping out of his car all over the country just for the sake of traveling— so the anti-glamourous lifestyle of a touring singer-songwriter suited him well. 

Eric Teel

When Indianapolis sisters Lily and Madeleine first started making music together, it didn’t cross their minds that they could make a living at it. Although they now find themselves in an acclaimed full-fledged career, what got them here has nothing to do with money, and everything to do with the spirit.

JPR recently upgraded the online tool we use to manage community events. Please delete any old bookmarks you may have created to the previous calendar tool, as that site is no longer updating. To view JPR's new community calendar follow THIS LINK.

NOTE: If you used the old site to post an event before June 10th, it is possible that it did not get properly imported to our new calendar. We recommend that you check your event to ensure it imported correctly.

Mike Edel couldn’t have named his sophomore release more poetically. Even the title, India, Seattle feels like a story on its own. Two polarized locations on opposite ends of the earth, one crawling with colors and noise and the other lying silent and blue in the corner of America. Part of growing a little bit older, a little bit wiser is the awareness that comes inside growing spaces.

On Saturday, July 2nd at 3pm, JPR will broadcast Garrison Keillor's final episode of A Prairie Home Companion as he takes to the stage at the famed Hollywood Bowl.