Barbara Dellenback

Morning Edition Host

Barbara Dellenback began her experience with radio journalism when she stopped at a pay phone and called KLCC in Eugene to ask if they needed a volunteer. She soon became the substitute Morning Edition host and then the permanent host. She has worked the morning radio shift at KLCC, KUGN, KPNW, KAVE, and KINK.

Barbara took a 13-year break from radio to work with non-profit organizations as an Executive Director and Development Director. Then she got a call from JPR to be the local host for Morning Edition, and jumped at the chance to share her mornings with the region.

A Medford native, Barbara is happy to be back in the Rogue Valley.  When she is not reading newspapers (before they’re gone forever) or books, she is knitting, swimming, walking, or laughing.  She and her fretted-instrument-teacher husband, Dave Ouellette, have two sons living in Eugene. 

Ziko/Wikimedia

An Oregon Liquor Control Commission task force says the state needs to change the system to increase consumer access to spirits.

It will be up to the Legislature to decide, and the task force suggested some ideas Thursday in recommendations to the commission.

Kelly Piet Photography

New state data show that Oregon Health Plan members are making fewer visits to the emergency room and more visits to primary care providers.

Per-person spending growth fell by 1 percentage point.

Jorge Barrios/Wikimedia

The Oregon Legislature's legal advisors say local governments cannot 'just say no' to medical marijuana dispensaries.

The Oregonian reports that the opinion was sought after the city of Medford adopted a local ordinance saying business licenses will not be given to anyone who violates local, state, and federal laws.

governor.oregon.gov

Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber hasn't said whether or not he'll launch a re-election bid, but he's been busy collecting funds for one.

Kitzhaber's campaign has reported contributions of nearly $232,000 so far this year. More than half of it has come in during the last two months. He has matched the amount he raised in all of 2012.

Michael Jastremski/Wikimedia

The governors of Oregon, Washington, and California are joining a Canadian province Monday to announce a partnership to collectively combat climate change and promote clean energy.

The regional leaders will announce the partnership today at a San Francisco event.

Beachgoers along the Northern California coast are being warned to be careful of sneaker waves, large surf, and strong currents.

The National Weather Service has issued a beach hazards statement through Tuesday afternoon for the coast from Sonoma County to the Oregon border.

Beachgoers are advised to always keep their eyes on the ocean. Fishers are being told not to fish from rocks and jetties.

California has been granted an additional month to reduce its prison population, as negotiations continue on a longer-term delay.

Federal judges issue a one-paragraph ruling yesterday saying that a court-appointed mediator needs more time to seek agreement on how the state should reduce inmate crowding.

Governor Jerry Brown and state lawmakers want a three-year delay to give proposed rehabilitation programs time to work. Under a new state law, the alternative is to spend $315 million this fiscal year to house thousands of inmates in private prisons and county jails.

Jerrye & Roy Klotz MD/Wikimedia

Very few earthquake faults in California have been mapped over the past two decades despite an ambitious campaign launched in the early 1970's to help scientists learn more about the state's seismic activity.

The Los Angeles Times reports only 23 maps have been drawn since 1991 and there haven't been any between 2004 and 2011 because of budget cuts.

Jorge Barrios/Wikimedia

California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom says it's time for the state to get serious about legalizing marijuana. He says he is willing to put his political reputation on the line to make it happen.

Newson and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California announced Thursday that he is leading a blue-ribbon panel of medical, legal, and law enforcement experts who plan to spend the next 18-24 months studying how California can tax and regulate legal marijuana in an effective way.

Official Congressional Portrait

Republican Greg Walden of Oregon voted against the bill to end the partial government shutdown.

He broke with Speaker John Boehner but aligned himself with most of the GOP caucus.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Loggers may go back to work on national forests without waiting for federal agencies to lift logging bans prompted by the government shutdown.

Following a hearing in Medford yesterday, U.S. District Judge Owen Panner signed a temporary restraining order lifting the logging ban immediately.

Oregon law trumps local laws that try to ban medical marijuana dispensaries.  Ashland Representative Peter Buckley who sponsored the measure passed by the Oregon legislature legalizing the dispensaries, says the state Legislative Counsel made that ruling yesterday.
 The law takes effect in March 2014.
The City of Medford has voted to prohibit any dispensaries in the city. The vote last month, and revealed this week, bans any business licenses if they violate local, state, or federal law.

The Supreme Court has rejected California's appeal of a lower-court order that could force the state to release thousands of California prison inmates before they complete their sentences.

The justices did not comment on their order yesterday, which leaves in place the earlier ruling by a panel of three federal judges requiring California to reduce its prison population by an additional 9,600 inmates to improve conditions.

California Governor Jerry Brown has argued that the state cannot meet that goal without releasing dangerous felons and jeopardizing public safety.

Absolutely no medical marijuana dispensaries will be allowed in Medford, Oregon despite a state law that makes them legal next year, according to city officials.

Medford police chief Tim George says dispensing medical marijuana violates federal law and currently violates state law.

California officials knew a computer upgrade for the state's unemployment insurance program was vulnerable to problems before it was installed.

The Sacramento Bee reports that officials underestimated how many unemployment claims would be affected by a glitch in the $188 million system upgrade.

The data-conversion problem eventually delayed jobless benefits for nearly $150,000 Californians.

A surprise extension of a federal subsidy to Oregon timber counties will prevent jail shutdowns and keep deputies on the road for now, but local officials say the money is only a fraction of what they need. In one cash-strapped county the infusion has started discussion that it could do more harm in the long run, than good.

The federal payout will bring about $100 million to Oregon. Some of the funds are earmarked for schools and roads. In parts of Western Oregon some is available for law enforcement.

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden says problems with hiring practices that discriminated against veterans and other applicants at the Bonneville Power Administration must be fixed as soon as possible.

Wyden, who chairs the Senate Energy Committee, says he met with the head of the Department of Energy to discuss how to get the BPA back on track.

A report from the U. S. Department of Energy's inspector general was released earlier this week. It blasted the BPA for consistently manipulating the rating process for applicants and subjecting whistleblowers to retaliation.

Eric E. Johnson/Flickr

Oregon has released its redesigned report cards for the state's public schools and districts.

The new cards track more information than in the past about student performance, school curricula, and college readiness.

Democratic lawmakers on key policy committees say they want to limit California's practice of keeping hundreds of inmates in solitary confinement for years, sometimes decades, as a way of controlling violent prison gangs.

They held the first in a planned series of hearings Wednesday in response to an inmate hunger strike this summer that at one point involved more than 30,000 of the 133,000 inmates in state prisons.

The inmates were protesting conditions for gang leaders held in isolation at Pelican Bay and three other prisons.

Seven states, including Oregon, are suing the Environmental Protection Agency over health-damaging air pollution from outdoor wood-fired boilers that have become popular for residential heating.

The lawsuit fired Wednesday asks a federal court to order the EPA to review and adopt updated emissions limits for the boilers.

Jeff Manning of the Oregon Department of Justice says 25-year old rules should be updated to require sales of newer, cleaner-burning stoves. He says owners of old stoves will be allowed to keep the ones they have, and not be required to buy a new one.

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