April Ehrlich

Morning Edition Host/Jefferson Exchange Producer

April Ehrlich began freelancing for Jefferson Public Radio in 2016. She officially joined the team as Morning Edition Host and a Jefferson Exchange producer in August 2017.

April previously worked as a reporter, covering local government, housing, and the environment in southern Oregon, eastern Oregon and western Idaho.

April served a two-year stint with AmeriCorps, where she worked with nonprofits helping low-income communities in rural Oregon. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English at Cal-State University, Fullerton, where she worked as an editor for the campus paper.

April spends her free time hiking through nearby forests with a rambunctious border collie, or reading fiction at home with her two favorite cats.
 

northstatesymphony.org

Ravel.  Berlioz.  Pinkston.  Pinkston?  Yes, he is among the composers whose works will be performed by the North State Symphony in concerts this weekend (Nov. 11 in Chico, Nov. 12 in Redding). 

Dan Pinkston chairs the music department of Simpson University in Redding, and is the composer of a concerto for violin and symphony premiering at the concerts. 

It is the latest in a series of Pinkston works performed to acclaim around the world. 

Excel23/Wikimedia Commons

Americans love Wal-Mart.  Enough to spend most of their retail dollars there, anyway.  But Wal-Mart has many detractors, including people who blame the big store for killing off the mom-and-pop stores in many downtowns. 

Even Wal-Mart can't make a go of truly small towns, and that's where the dollar stores are taking hold, with nearly 2,000 expected to be built in the United States this year. 

Retail business observer Garrick Brown keeps an eye on trends in the retail world. 

Your local radio station, this one included, doesn't necessarily have to be local anymore. 

The FCC required local stations to keep studios in the cities to which they were licensed.  But that rule will be allowed to drop, so the friendly voice in Klamath Falls may actually be in Chicago. 

That's just one topic in the media of late.  There are always PLENTY of others, as explored by our partners on the communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Our montly perusal of media topics is called "Signals & Noise." 

BLM

Maybe you were visiting a big city and thought you'd go to a park.  But when you got there, you discovered the "park" was really an open area covered by concrete, with little in the way of natural amenities. 

Benjamin Vogt is an outspoken critic of the "nature deficit" he sees in urban areas. 

And he urges people to grow native plants around them, a point he pounds home in A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future

National Institute of Health

Will health care ever be out of the news?  Perhaps someday.  But today is not that day. 

With talk of "repeal and replace" still fresh in Washington and new calls for single-payer national health insurance (from Bernie Sanders et al), the topic is still quite lively. 

The Rogue Valley chapter of the League of Women Voters keeps the discussion going with a free public discussion of universal coverage, Thursday (November 9) in Medford. 

Wikimedia

You can be forgiven for not keeping up with the legalization of marijuana in Oregon and California.  The two states adopted legal pot at different times and through different pathways. 

Another shoe drops in California on January 1, 2018, when licensing for recreational cannabis sales is due to open. 

Oregon still has some procedures to work out as well, and then LOCAL jurisdictions are still figuring out what restrictions they want. 

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is in charge of non-medical marijuana; Danica Hibpshman of OLCC visits. 

She is joined by Brooke Staggs, who writes of cannabis in The Cannifornian

Kate Longley, davidhallberg.com

The beauty of ballet comes at a cost.  It is not easy for the best dancers to portray that level of beauty, without often punishing physical conditions. 

David Hallberg endured that and childhood bullying and a career-threatening injury for his art. 

He is the first American ever to dance for the world-renowned Bolshoi Ballet in Russia. 

And he tells the story of his rise in A Body of Work: Dancing to the Edge and Back

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Dennis Richardson broke a losing streak for the Republican party when he got elected Secretary of State in the 2016 election. 

And he's kept himself in the news with actions on elections, audits, and other duties of his office. 

Plus, he's raised a few eyebrows with his opinion on gay people, and his trade mission to China. 

Richardson hails from Southern Oregon, but spends less time in the region since his election. 

pixabay

Pet stores in California will be stocked differently under a bill just signed into law.  That law makes the state the first in the country to ban pet stores from selling animals raised in "breeding mills." 

Animal rights groups including PETA object to the treatment of animals from the breeders. 

The law will force pet stores to offer rescue animals for sale, though breeding operations can still sell direct to customers. 

The Group Social Compassion in Legislation also supported the change. 

BuzzFarmers

The idea of declaring a shelter crisis in Humboldt County has been considered for several years now. 

There are more homeless people than shelter beds to hold them, and a declaration of crisis could loosen up some building restrictions to allow housing to be created more quickly. 

Affordable Homeless Housing Alternatives--AHHA--plans to petition county supervisors at the November 7th meeting. 

Ashland Automotive

You know your car needs some work, but you're not sure the work the garage proposes to do is what it needs. 

It's not the first time someone has had doubts about the quality or veracity of automotive work.  What's your car-repair tale of woe? 

We'll share them with Zach Edwards of Ashland Automotive in our monthly "Squeaky Wheel" segment. 

Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53574398

Medicine is a science... a body is a body, and approaches to treatment are supposed to be roughly the same from patient to patient.  But bias creeps into medicine, as in many other fields. 

Dayna Bowen Matthew, a lawyer who works in a medical school, tracks the thousands of people of color who get sub-standard medical care in America in her book Just Medicine: A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care

And she visits Ashland for a speech on the subject tonight (November 6). 

Wikimedia

Stephen Most is both a published author and a documentary filmmaker. 

So it figures that at some point he'd write a book about documentaries. 

That book is Stories Make the World: Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary.

It's more than setting up a camera, he explains... it's an artistic process to portray life. 

Siskiyou Mountain Club

William Sullivan is already one of the most accomplished hikers in Oregon. 

And he clearly goes back and checks on the places he hiked in the past. 

The result: a Fourth Edition of his book 100 Hikes/Travel Guide: Southern Oregon & Northern California.  With 18 hikes mapped out in the Eastern Siskiyou Mountains alone, this potentially represents years worth of hiking for the ambitious traveler. 

Wikimedia

Just the TERM "climate change" produces a range of reactions.  And a range of actions, too. 

Consider the Oregon Stewardship Tour, set up by Citizens' Climate Lobby. 

The tour visits cities around Oregon's vast Second Congressional District to talk about ways to address carbon through economic means... carbon pricing and market-based solutions. 

Brian Ettling is co-founder of the Southern Oregon chapter of CCL; Jim Walls is the executive director of the Lake County Resources Initiative

Steven Larsen, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9642238

"I did NOT mean to say that!"  Ever uttered that phrase? 

You have lots of company, and it's just possible that you're all wrong.  Psychologists can demonstrate that many things we do emerge from our unconscious minds, instead of from the turned-on conscious brain. 

Dr. John Bargh knows the unconscious mind well, and he gives us a tour in his book Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do

Can we turn our knowledge of the unconscious into more deliberate behavior?  Yes! 

tiffanywilsonmusic.com

If you want to start a conversation that you know will last a while, ask Josh Gross about favorite bands. 

He loves music, and across a wide spectrum of genres and styles. 

Josh makes music, and writes about music for the Rogue Valley Messenger

And once a month, he visits the studio with "Rogue Sounds," a compilation of musical samples and news of coming band dates. 

Oregon State University Archives

The debate over immigration into the United States occasionally gets to the issue of workers INVITED into the country from Mexico. 

Lina Cordia, a Medford librarian and local historian, lays out the facts and figures in a lecture on the program. 

It is part of the Windows in Time series of the Southern Oregon Historical Society, and it's called “The Fruits of their Labors: the Bracero Program in Southern Oregon 1942-1964.”

Lina Cordia presents the program today (November 1) at noon at the library in Medford, and November 8 at noon at the Ashland library. 

Choe Kwangmo/Wikimedia

Take a look at your property tax bill and note how much money goes to local government.  And still schools and cities and counties struggle to provide services with the money that comes in--especially in counties that traditionally depended on federal timber receipts, now mostly gone. 

So counties and cities look to the private sector to take on what were public services, from libraries to mental health. 

Matt Rowe is a former mayor of Coquille, with a perspective on what leads smaller cities to consider outsourcing. 

Bruce Sorte from the Rural Studies Program at Oregon State University studies policy options that face smaller governments. 

Shahbaz Nahian, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36011595

Catching some Zs.  Getting 40 Winks.  Slipping into the Arms of Morphius. 

We have many expressions for getting some sleep, but our knowledge about what we get from sleep was fairly limited, until recently. 

Now we have a better idea what benefits sleep gives to us; physically, mentally, and even creatively.  The knowledge comes from places like the sleep lab at the University of California-Berkeley, run by Matthew Walker. 

He is the author of a new book, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams

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