Anna King

Anna King calls Richland, Washington home and loves unearthing great stories about people in the Northwest. She reports for the Northwest News Network from a studio at Washington State University, Tri–Cities. She covers the Mid–Columbia region, from nuclear reactors to Mexican rodeos.

The South Sound was her girlhood backyard and she knows its rocky beaches, mountain trails and cities well. She left the west side to attend Washington State University and spent an additional two years studying language and culture in Italy.

While not on the job, Anna enjoys snowboarding, clam digging, hiking and wine tasting with friends. She lives in Richland with her husband Andy Plymale.

Several lawsuits are stacking up across the Northwest and in Vancouver, B.C. against the driver and tour company of a bus that crashed near Pendleton, Ore. a year ago Monday.

At a small Presbyterian church in Richland, Washington, one pastor has been trying to spread a little solace with an unusual exhibit.

Northwest wine grape growers expect this week's cold weather to do some damage to their vineyards. But it’s not clear yet how much of next year’s fruit might be affected.

The region’s cold snap has many dairy operators and ranchers taking extra care with their livestock. When it’s cold, cattle and other types of livestock tend to eat more to stay warm.

A so-called megaload is stuck just a few miles south of Pendleton on it’s winding route through the Northwest.

A massive load of oil equipment is on its way to Canada, along a winding route that began near Hermiston, in northeast Oregon. 

We all burp sometimes. It turns out, so do underground waste tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

Early crop reports from farmers say Washington and Oregon’s wine grape harvest appears to be up a tick for 2013.

The Yakama Nation’s steelhead reconditioning program is like a retreat spa for fish. And it's changing the circle of life for the species.

The state of Washington grows about 300 types of crops -- from the lush valleys north of Seattle, to the orchards of the Columbia Basin, to the rolling fields between Spokane and Walla Walla. And if you ask any of those farmers about Washington’s Initiative 522 and you’ll get every kind of answer.

New advisories from health officials in Washington and Oregon warn that some fish in the Columbia River aren’t safe to eat.

Tests of alfalfa seed from a field in eastern Washington have come back positive for genetically engineered genes called Round-Up-Ready.

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