Anna King

Anna King calls Richland, Washington home and loves unearthing great stories about people in the Northwest. She reports for the Northwest News Network from a studio at Washington State University, Tri–Cities. She covers the Mid–Columbia region, from nuclear reactors to Mexican rodeos.

The South Sound was her girlhood backyard and she knows its rocky beaches, mountain trails and cities well. She left the west side to attend Washington State University and spent an additional two years studying language and culture in Italy.

While not on the job, Anna enjoys snowboarding, clam digging, hiking and wine tasting with friends. She lives in Richland with her husband Andy Plymale.

Small-town hospitals and clinics across the Northwest are scrambling to prepare for Ebola.

An arctic air mass has swept into the Northwest. Cold air and snow are expected from central Washington through central Oregon and even into Idaho’s central Panhandle.

Each day now, travelers are arriving home to the Northwest who may have been exposed to Ebola. In Oregon, a woman who has come back from West Africa was just hospitalized Friday with a fever. 

Across the Northwest medical professionals are getting ready for Ebola.

In rural parts of the Northwest, many believe owning a gun is sort of like owning a garden trowel. You just have one or two around.

The Environmental Protection Agency intends to fine the U.S. Department of Energy up to $10,000 per week if radioactive waste just a stone's throw from the Columbia River isn’t cleaned up.

Genetically modified wheat has been found at a university research center in Montana. That news Friday came as a federal investigation into a similar case in Oregon concludes with few answers.

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, U.S. government officials rounded up Japanese-Americans and sent them to harsh, ill-equipped camps. Now, the National Park Service has announced $3 million in new grants to help preserve that important history.

As the Northwest is bathed in autumn’s golden light, wineries across the region are harvesting, crushing grapes and making wine full bore. This year’s fruit looks petite and powerful.

Kent Stokes, 28, can’t believe who survived the Carlton Complex wildfire.

A skeleton that's about 9,000 years old is giving up a few of his secrets today. Monday, scientists who have a new book about the ancient remains found near Kennewick 18 years ago spoke to the press.

Washington state’s new pot grow operations have state-required alarm systems, dozens of cameras and tall fences. But some growers said they aren’t worried about theft and violence.

In Eastern Washington, a pair of very different guys teamed up to embark on an experiment to grow Washington’s latest agricultural crop -- legal marijuana. 

Figuring out how to maximize yields on legal marijuana in Washington state will be tricky -- and not every licensed farmer will survive the competition and the tight margins.

As legal pot growing operations spring to life from urban King County to remote corners of Washington state, an ongoing debate has developed within this new farming community.

Eric Cooper has a sort of "The Dude" vibe: Hawaiian shirt, leather brown sandals and a bushy silver goatee. He smoked weed for the first time when he was about 14. He’s a former contractor and registered nurse. Cooper grew medical marijuana, and now he’s one of the owners of Monkey Grass Farms in Wenatchee, Washington.

The Timberbowl Rodeo, in the town of Darrington, Washington, saw some of its largest crowds ever this past weekend. Neighbors gathered at the event to hug, shake hands and heal up a bit from this year's nearby terrible Oso landslide.

Bighorn sheep in the Northwest have their lambs in early spring. About now, those babies start playing together in the mountains – a sort of lamb daycare.

When you think organic, you probably visualize fresh, sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables. But what makes that delicious organic produce grow?

Northwest sweet cherry growers say this season they'll likely pick their third-largest haul ever -- 20 million boxes.

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