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The Week In Sports

May 28, 2016
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Dallas' Stray Dog Problem Gets Worse After Woman's Death

May 28, 2016
Copyright 2016 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 WDET-FM. To see more, visit WDET-FM.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The dictionary defines ageism as the "tendency to regard older persons as debilitated, unworthy of attention, or unsuitable for employment." But research indicates that ageism may not just be ill-informed or hurtful. It may also be a matter of life and death.

Not that it's literally killing people. Researcher Becca Levy, a professor of epidemiology and psychology at the Yale School of Public Health, says it depends on how much a given individual takes those negative ideas to heart.

How To Fix A Graduation Rate Of 1 In 10? Ask The Dropouts

May 28, 2016

On San Jose State University's lush inner-city campus, students in their graduation gowns pose with their families in front of ivy-covered buildings.

They're the lucky ones.

Just 10 percent of students graduate from this public university in four years. After six years, it's only a bit more than half.

Think about that — of 100 students who enrolled four years ago, only 10 will walk across the stage this year.

That sounds low, but you can find these kind of numbers at lots of universities in the U.S.

#NPRreads: 4 Reads To Keep You Young This Weekend

May 28, 2016

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

­­­­­­American farms should be in full swing right now. But some farmers are running behind, waiting on work visas for planters and pickers from out of the country. The H-2A visa program is delayed for the third year in a row.

It sounds like the setup to a bad joke: A professor and a doctor walk onto a farm.

Kathleen Terrence, a pediatrician, kneels in an onion field outside Lisbon, N.Y., with a bunch of kids. As they prepare to plant some 30,000 onions, they're all taking tips from Mark Sturges — but he's no farmer, either. He's a literary critic.

For five days and five nights in February, NPR reporters Jason Beaubien and Kelly McEvers were "embedded" with Doctors Without Borders in the middle of nowhere. They were inside a massive United Nation's compound framed by earthen walls topped with razor wire. It's known as the POC — Protection of Civilians site. Heavily-armed U.N. peacekeepers patrol the perimeter of the compound; more than 120,000 civilians live there, seeking a safe haven in a war-torn country.

Peter and Pam Hayes's claim about herbicide exposure in the forest of the Oregon Coast Range begins the same way as most from the news in recent years.

On May 17, they and two others were out tending their property. They heard a helicopter in the distance and thought little of it. Then, they say, they began to smell and taste chemicals.

“The helicopter was not over me. It was not droplets. It was just a super strong, strong taste," Pam said.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drew hard questions from conservationists Thursday night in Portland as it sought comment on its latest budget proposal.

In a stuffy hotel conference room over the hum of a projector, ODFW Director Curt Melcher explained the agency's current budget situation, how a new task force had been established to seek new revenue sources and that no major changes were planned for any of the agency's programs.

A federal jury in Seattle has awarded a former BNSF Railway worker, and whistleblower, more than $1.6 million.

In 2010, Curtis Rookaird alerted federal officials that his employer had told him to forego an important brake test on a train carrying oil and hazardous materials. He was later fired.

Judges Reject Steens Mountain Wind Project

May 27, 2016

The Ninth District Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the Oregon Natural Desert Association, and rejected a wind turbine project on Steens Mountain in southeast Oregon.

The 104-megawatt project would have included energy transmission lines that cut across potential sage grouse habitat within the protected Steens Cooperative Project.

Since the legalization of recreational marijuana in Oregon last year, there’s been an explosion or pot-related events, from big celebrations like Weed the People and the Cultivation Classic to "yoganja" classes and house concerts. But now all these events are up in the air due to a confluence of clarifications from state and city authorities, including the city's pot officials saying they will begin to crack down on events that sell tickets and then give away marijuana.

Cottage Grove To Vote On Local Pot Tax in November

May 27, 2016

Voters in Cottage Grove could decide to tax marijuana sold in the city. Monday city councilors voted to place a 3-percent pot tax on the November ballot.

The University of Oregon is in the national news again, not in a good way. Hundreds of students left a huge mess on an island in Northern California’s Shasta Lake.

  The Mims House became the first black-owned property in Eugene in 1948, after previous ordinances prohibited people of color from purchasing property or living within city limits. Eric Alan speaks with Willie Mims about the living history there, including visits from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

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