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Back in the 1970s, Gens Johnson got really interested in handmade and regional art. She started buying pieces from shops in Portland and across the Northwest.

“I bought two pieces that were scrimshaw, and they were done on whale ivory and walrus tusk,” she said.

Scrimshaw is a kind of carving – typically of boats and sea life. It was popularized by whalers in the 1800s.

“I was concerned when I bought it that it wasn’t elephant ivory, and I really didn’t think there was any problem with it being a sea mammal product,” Johnson said.

The beverage giant PepsiCo has announced a plan to cut the sugar content and calories of drinks it sells around the globe.

The ACLU of Oregon announced Monday it has filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of a transgender woman who is an inmate in a state prison. The group says the Oregon Department of Corrections has refused to provide her medical care for gender dysphoria

Michelle Wright, 25, serving time for an attempted robbery. Wright was born male but has identified as and dressed as a female since she was a teenager.

Oregon remains close to the national basement when it comes to its high school graduation rate, according to a report out Monday.

Less than 74 percent of Oregon’s high school seniors graduated on time in 2015. That’s nearly 10 points below the national average. President Barack Obama recently touted the 83 percent national average as "the highest on record."

Defense Rests Its Case In Malheur Trial

Oct 17, 2016

The defense rested its case Monday afternoon in the trial of seven people who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge earlier this year. The prosecution followed with a brief rebuttal case.

Earlier in the day, Fabio Minoggio — a government informant who went by the name “John Killman” at the refuge — testified about his role in the occupation.

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President Obama had a number on his mind today, and it has nothing to do with politics or the election. Here he is this morning at a high school in the nation's capital.


What Best in Show did for dog shows and what A Mighty Wind did for folk music, the new mockumentary Mascots does for, well, mascots. The film, from director Christopher Guest, follows contestants in the World Mascot Association Championship.

Mosul after ISIS will be a test for all of Iraq

Oct 17, 2016
Azad Lashkari/Reuters

A long-awaited offensive to recapture the Iraqi city of Mosul from the Islamic State began early Monday morning, with US forces involved in their largest operation since withdrawing from the country in 2011.

Some 30,000 soldiers are taking part in the battle for the extremist group’s last major stronghold in Iraq. Among them are Kurdish fighters, the Iraqi army, Shiite militias and Sunni tribal groups — a patchwork alliance of unlikely allies backed by US airpower and support.

Even after Nov. 8, no matter who is elected, many don't expect the partisan infighting that has highlighted this year's unusually ugly campaign to come to an end.

But in an interview with NPR's Robert Siegel, Vice President Biden struck a hopeful tone, saying that Hillary Clinton and Democrats could be effective if she wins the presidency.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Recently, for the first time in its 126-year history, the Arizona Republic endorsed a democratic candidate for president. The backlash has been intense.

Mi-Ai Parrish, the head of the paper, published an editorial today about the threats she and her staff have been receiving.

Threats like:

Retired Marine Gen. James E. Cartwright pleaded guilty to a single count of making false statements to federal authorities. The investigators were looking into a leak of classified information about a secret cyberattack on Iran's nuclear facilities.

The plea came in a brief appearance in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.

What happens when two human political journalists compete against a computer over which can do the best job predicting the issues that will dominate the news in the presidential election? Well, you are about to find out.

What a 'rigged' election actually looks like

Oct 17, 2016

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump stated unequivocally on Sunday that the US election is rigged.

"The election is absolutely being rigged by the dishonest and distorted media pushing Crooked Hillary," Trump tweeted.

Nearly 1 in 5 children each year suffers a psychiatric illness, according to research estimates. But a national shortage of medical specialists and inpatient facilities means that many still go untreated — despite national efforts to improve mental health care.

Transcript: Sen. Tim Kaine's Remarks at Pneuma Church on October 16, 2016

Buenos días a todos. Estoy bien contento a visitar con ustedes en el Pneuma Church y doy gracias al Reverendo García y su familia tan especial para la oportunidad a charla un momentito con ustedes.

Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

Many Nigerians feared the family reunions would never happen.

But 21 school girls held for more than two years by the extremists of Boko Haram were reunited with their anguished families Sunday.

"As you can imagine, the parents were ecstatic. They were in tears," says Nigerian author and journalist Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani. "A mother carried her [released] daughter on her back and held her wrapped around her back for most of the ceremony."

Austria Decides To Tear Hitler's House Down

Oct 17, 2016

The Austrian government says it plans to tear down the house where Adolf Hitler was born to prevent the property from being a pilgrimage site for neo-Nazis.

This comes after a long fight with the current owner, who for years has rejected the government's attempts to purchase the property located in Braunau, near the German border. Now, the government intends to confiscate it, reporter Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells our Newscast unit.

A newly released report describes disintegrating mental health among dozens of the more than 1,100 people being held by Australia on the Pacific island nation of Nauru.

The report out Monday from Amnesty International is based largely on interviews conducted by Anna Neistat, a researcher working for the watchdog group, in July with 58 people being held on the island. It focuses on self-harm, calling it "shockingly commonplace."

Thirteen years ago, just as the United States began what was to become its longest war, a futuristic wheelchair hit the market.

The iBOT allowed paralyzed people, including many veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, to stand up by rising to eye level. It also did something no wheelchair ever had: climb stairs.

A Florida judge has sentenced a man who shot at George Zimmerman during a confrontation to 20 years in prison.

Zimmerman fatally shot unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012 in a case that struck a chord nationwide. He was later acquitted of all charges.