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1:00 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Washington Levels New Sanctions At Russia, Pulls Some Punches

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 3:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The new economic sanctions ordered by the Treasury Department today targets 17 Russian companies, along with seven government officials, some with close ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The individuals include the chairman and a board member of Russia's largest state-owned oil company. European governments are expected to add their own financial penalties, but so far, there's little sign the Russian leader is yielding to the pressure. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Between Farmers And Frackers, Calif. Water Caught In Tussle

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:08 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Water supplies in California are tight with the state's severe drought and that's putting a spotlight on hydraulic fracturing or fracking. The controversial oil and gas extraction technique uses freshwater, which can mean millions of gallons for each fracking site.

Lauren Sommer of member station KQED reports from California's Central Valley, where tensions between oil and agriculture are on the rise.

(SOUNDBITE OF BEES)

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Johnny Clegg On South Africa, Post-Mandela

Johnny Clegg performs in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:49 pm

Johnny Clegg‘s song “Asimbonanga” resurfaced after the death of Nelson Mandela last year, being widely shared online. The song was an anti-apartheid anthem, calling for the release of Mandela when he was jailed. Mandela would later join him on stage for the performance of the song.

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Code Switch
12:07 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Who Runs The World? 'Time' Magazine Says Beyoncé

This image released by Time shows entertainer Beyoncé on the cover of the magazine's "100 Most Influential People" issue.
Time Magazine AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:22 am

The euphoria over Lupita Nyong'o's appearance on People's "50 Most Beautiful" list was still swirling on the Interwebs when word came, a mere four days later, that Time's "100 Most Influential" issue was on newsstands. Staring out at us was Beyoncé Knowles Carter, dressed in what appears to be a white two-piece bathing suit with a see-through cover-up.

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NPR Story
11:47 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Can France Maintain Its Famous Work-Life Balance?

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:46 pm

Employees in France are in a league of their own. They work a 35 hours a week. They get six weeks of paid leave, plus generous striking rights.

And in the past few weeks, new rules have been agreed to that allow some employees to literally switch off their email when they leave the office in the evening.

So if you’re in Asia or America and hoping to discuss a business venture with your contact in France after their work day has ended, you’ll just have to call back at a more convenient time. C’est la vie.

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NPR Story
11:47 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Pfizer Bids To Buy AstraZeneca

Financial Times Reporter Cardiff Garcia joins us to talk about the U.S. pharmaceutical giant Pfizer’s $100 billion offer to buy British-Swedish drug maker AstraZeneca.

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The Salt
11:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Poutine Burger

Putting Canada on top of America is both delicious and geographically accurate.
NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:35 pm

Poutine, if you don't know, is a Canadian dish made up of French fries topped with cheese curds and gravy. And if you don't know, you really haven't been living your life to its fullest. Seriously, what have you been doing? Go get some poutine. Then come back and read about this poutine burger — an open-face hamburger topped with poutine — we ate from Spritzburger in Chicago. We'll wait. We have to. We can't move.

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Theater
11:42 am
Mon April 28, 2014

For Alan Cumming, Life Is (Once Again) A Cabaret

This is the third time Alan Cumming has starred in Cabaret. Each of the productions with Cumming was directed by Sam Mendes. Rob Marshall choreographed both American productions and co-directed the new one.
Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 3:20 pm

Alan Cumming has starred in the musical Cabaret three times — a 1993 London production, a Tony-winning 1998 Broadway revival, and a new Broadway revival — and it hasn't gotten old. "It's so energetic, and it just takes up every single element of being an actor," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Cumming plays the master of ceremonies in a debaucherous Berlin nightclub called the Kit Kat Klub. The role was originated by Joel Grey, who starred in the original 1966 Broadway production as well as the 1972 movie.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Red Tape Ensnares Pakistani Baby Born In India

No love lost: Indian and Pakistani border guards.
K.M. Chaudary AP

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:49 pm

A 2-week-old boy born to a Pakistani couple visiting India is being denied permission to return home with his parents because he lacks the proper travel documentation.

The story begins with Mai Fatima, her husband, Mir Muhammad Mahar, and their two children. The couple, from Ghotki, Pakistan, were expecting a third child when they went to Basanpir, India, 2 1/2 months ago to visit Mai Fatima's father.

But her father died during their visit; she subsequently gave birth to a boy on April 14.

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Parallels
11:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

How To Survive In Iraqi Politics

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is seeking another four years in power. The country votes Wednesday amid increased violence between the security forces and opposition groups.
Sabah Arar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:21 pm

Low to the dusty ground, by a reed-fringed river and a lush date palm orchard, is the farmhouse where Iraq's prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, grew up.

The place is Junaja, one of hundreds of poor, Shiite Muslim farming towns in southern Iraq. Donkey carts jog alongside battered buses. No monument, no ostentation honors Maliki. The only new thing in town is the mosque.

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