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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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July is National Ice Cream Month. Last July, a Cincinnati woman made national headlines when she made a discovery that shocked her.

After sitting out for hours in the summer heat, an ice cream sandwich still appeared intact and just slightly melted. What gives? What natural (or unnatural) ingredient could make this frozen treat withstand 80 degree temperature?

The U.S. open gets underway today, and there’s a buzz in the air as Serena Williams tries to complete her first Grand Slam – winning all four major tennis competitions in one season.

For what is believed to be the first time in history, tickets for the women’s final sold out before tickets for the men’s final. Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News for a look at the U.S. Open and women’s tennis through a business lens.

Daniel James Brown‘s book about the University of Washington’s eight-oar rowing team, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” was a bestseller for months when it was published in 2013.

As part of a series of listening sessions across the country, representatives from the Bureau of Land Management recently came to Gillette, Wyoming, to meet with residents about the agency’s federal coal program.

The BLM says it wants to modernize the program to ensure American taxpayers receive a fair return on mining on federal lands. A reformed program will be an additional blow to the coal industry, already struggling with declining production and restrictive regulations.

Self-Help Author And Speaker Wayne Dyer Dies At 75

Aug 31, 2015

Wayne Dyer, the writer, philosopher and motivational speaker who encouraged millions of people to look at their lives in a new way, died this weekend at age 75. Over four decades, Dyer sought to motivate people to explore their passions and turn away from negativity.

Dyer died late Saturday in Maui, according to his publisher, Hay House.

Dr. David Burkons graduated from medical school and began practicing obstetrics and gynecology in 1973, the same year the Supreme Court issued its landmark abortion decision in Roe v. Wade.

Burkons liked delivering babies. But he is also committed to serving all his patients, including those who choose abortions.

Donald Trump got his start in real estate, and over the years he's owned and sold many of New York City's great buildings, including the Plaza Hotel and the St. Moritz.

His image as a developer endures, even though these days, Trump's real estate holdings are surprisingly sparse.

Ever since his presidential campaign took off, the Trump buildings have become full-blown New York City tourist attractions.

Tour guide Ned Callon recently led a group of French and Chinese tourists as they snapped selfies beneath an oversized gold "TRUMP" sign at 40 Wall Street.

Ken Kesey Mural Dedicated In Springfield

Aug 31, 2015

Renowned author and Merry Prankster Ken Kesey grew up in Springfield. The city recently commissioned a two-story, photo-realistic mural to honor their hometown son.

Recycled Wastewater Provides Blank Canvas For Craft Brewers

Aug 31, 2015

Ever wanted to drink a beer that used to be part wastewater? You may get that chance soon.

Oregon's craft beer obsession expanded with the second annual Pure Water Brew Competition, which took place at the Raccoon Lodge in Beaverton Saturday.

The competition featured beer brewed by members of Oregon Brew Crew, Oregon's oldest home brew club. All of the beer was made from wastewater supplied by Hillsboro-based Clean Water Services of Washington County.

Luigi Novi/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:9.13.09OliverSacksByLuigiNovi.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>

World-renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks's devotion to the humanity of scientific study was perhaps his greatest gift. He could convey the unfathomable complexity of the human brain in ways that everyone could understand.

He also highlighted his own experiences with hallucinations. Sacks once wrote that about 20 minutes after taking LSD, he remembered seeing the color indigo.

“Luminous, numinous, it filled me with rapture: it was the color of heaven,” he wrote.

Neurologist Oliver Sacks, who died Sunday, once described himself as an "old Jewish atheist," but during the decades he spent studying the human brain, he sometimes found himself recording experiences that he likened to a godly cosmic force.

Such was the case once when Sacks tried marijuana in the 1960s: He was looking at his hand, and it appeared to be retreating from him, yet getting larger and larger.

A longtime federal judge struggled Monday over what constitutes justice for members of one of Washington, D.C.'s most notorious drug rings.

Senior U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth pressed a public defender about the fate of Melvin Butler, a man who helped flood the city with cocaine that contributed to waves of violence in the late 1980s.

"You're saying that I can't consider the fact that he was one of the biggest drug dealers in the history of our city?" the judge asked. "Congress has tied my hands and I can't consider that?"

After a last-ditch effort to reach a settlement in the legal dispute over the NFL's four-game suspension of quarterback Tom Brady, a federal judge says he'll issue his ruling on Brady's appeal on either Tuesday or Wednesday.

On Monday morning, Brady and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell attended discussions about a possible settlement. But after it became clear that the two sides don't intend to give ground, District Judge Richard Berman held a brief hearing to announce that he'll rule on the case early this week.

Though they were not victorious in Sunday's Little League World Series title game, the Red Land Little League Team received a hero's welcome from fans in Lewisberry, Pa., Sunday night.

They lined the streets, cheered and waved signs for a team that still owns the bragging rights to the title "United States champions," which they won on Saturday. But the next day, Red Land came up short in a tension-filled Little League World Series title game — jumping out to an eight-run lead but ultimately losing 18-11 to Japan.

Rebuilding A Forest After The Burn

Aug 31, 2015

The Canyon Creek Complex has left big swaths of Malheur National Forest with charcoal stumps and ashen hillsides. When the first big rain of the year comes through, much of that ash will end up clogging streams and culverts if measures are not taken now to shore up vulnerable hillsides.

How do we raise a global nation?

Aug 31, 2015
Monica Campbell

It seems obvious to say that to catch a glimpse of America's future, just head to a public school classroom. And those changes are probably bigger than a lot of us realize.

Police in Thailand are looking for two new suspects, a woman and a man, in connection with a bombing in Bangkok that left 20 dead.

Michael Sullivan filed this report from Thailand for Newscast:

Will Smith from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was my first American friend. Ours was an unlikely friendship: a shy Indian kid, fresh off the boat, with big glasses and a thick accent, and a high school b-ball player from West Philadelphia, chillin' out maxin' and relaxin' all cool. And yet, I was with Will all the way, unnerved when he accidentally gave Carlton speed, shaken when he got shot in Season 5, and deeply embarrassed every time he wiped out in front of Veronica.

Itzhak Perlman: Charting A Charismatic Career

Aug 31, 2015

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