NPR Story
8:00 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Washington Legislature Fails To Pass Any Oil Train Legislation

Increased oil train traffic had put public pressure on Washington lawmakers to act, but none of this session's oil-train bills passed before the Legislature adjourned Friday.
flickr/Russ Allison Loar https://www.flickr.com/photos/11072040@N08/6184231577/in/photolist-aqtNAn-9d8NnY-dMMvL1-9bXnje-fa6tG7-cCoWk1-cCp1fU-cCp3yQ-cCoSAq-cCoYf1-cCoUqj-cCoP3Q-cCoR5b-cCoLWY-cCoJUo-cCoD3Q-cCoGSL-foFREg-eQovqh-

SEATTLE -- More oil is moving through Washington state from the Bakken oil fields, putting public pressure on elected officials to pass laws protecting public health and the environment.

Bakken oil from North Dakota and Montana has proven extremely flammable, causing several explosions in North America, including one that killed 47 people in Quebec last July.

Read more
Politics & Government
5:44 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Facing A Hot Wildfire Season, Officials Pitch New Funding Bill

Credit Federal Emergency Management Agency

This summer is shaping up to be a hot season for wildfires, especially on the west coast. Federal officials and lawmakers took the opportunity Monday to urge passage of legislation that would treat big wildfires like other natural disasters. They say this would fix a problem that’s hampered efforts to prevent the fires in the first place.

Read more
Oregonians Unprepared for Retirement
5:43 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Oregon Panel To Look At Ways To Increase Rates Of Retirement Savings

401(K) 2013 Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 5:01 pm

The responsibility of saving for retirement is falling more and more on the shoulders of employees.

Read more
more people headed to Oregon's beaches
4:33 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Spring Can Be Dangerous On The Coast

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:50 am

The arrival of warmer temperatures means more people headed to Oregon's beaches. But, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department says March can be a dangerous month for the coast. Parks and Rec Safety Coordinator Robert Smith says driftwood or other logs on the beach can be dislodged quickly with just a few inches of water. He adds sneaker waves can come out of nowhere and are deadly.

Read more
Livability-dot-com's top ten list
4:32 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Eugene's Downtown Makes Top Ten List

The Barnlight is one of the many new businesses in Eugene's downtown.

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 12:49 pm

Eugene has made Livability-dot-com's top ten list of Best Downtowns for 2014.

The website points to the transformation of Eugene's center over the past several years from a place with empty pits and vacant buildings to one with housing, theaters, and lots of restaurants and offices. Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy credits the efforts of city staff, residents and a 200 million dollar investment. Piercy says being on a list with cities such as Alexandria, Virginia and Fort Worth, Texas is a nice recognition.

Read more
cross-border water treaty
4:31 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Canada, U.S. Disagree Over Value of Columbia River Treaty Benefits

File photo of the Columbia River's Chief Joseph Dam near Bridgeport, Washington. The dam is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 7:12 pm

British Columbia has staked out a negotiating position on a cross-border water treaty that puts it at odds with public utilities and ratepayers in the U.S. Northwest.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Interior Secretary: 1 Percent Of Wildfires Take 30 Percent Of Funds

A U.S. Forest Service photo shows firefighters near the perimeter of the Elk Complex fire near Pine, Idaho, last summer. Lawmakers are calling for a change in the way America pays for wildfire disasters.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 3:44 pm

Western lawmakers and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell urge changes to the way America pays to fight and recover from wildfires, starting with preserving money that's meant for fire prevention. They met with fire officials Monday who predicted a busy fire season for much of the West.

NPR's Nathan Rott reports for our Newscast unit:

"Secretary Jewell says her department and the U.S. Forest Service spend more than $3 billion annually fighting fires. A third of that is spent on megafires, the biggest 1 percent of any season's blazes.

Read more
NPR Story
3:30 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Congress Studies New Way To Fund Massive Wildfires

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell discusses the wildfire forecast at a news briefing in Boise. She's flanked by Idaho Gov. Butch Otter (left) and Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, Jim Risch, R-Idaho, and Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. (Right, L-R).
Aaron Kunz

BOISE, Idaho -- A coalition of Congressional Democrats and Republicans gathered in Boise today [Monday] to tout a proposal that would change the way the federal government pays for firefighting operations in the West and beyond.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell joined all four federal senators from Oregon and Idaho, an Idaho congressman, as well as Idaho’s governor at the National Interagency Fire Center.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Sept. 11 Conspirator: Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Had No Military Role

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 4:03 pm

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, made a submission to federal court in Manhattan on behalf of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, who is on trial there. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith is "an eloquent, spellbinding speaker," but he did not have any prior knowledge of al-Qaida operations, Mohammed said.

As we reported earlier this month on the first day of Abu Ghaith's trial:

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:19 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Big Drop In Colon Cancer Fuels Push To Get More People Screened

Many people think that colon cancer screening is no walk in the park. This giant inflatable colon on display at the University of Miami Health System campus was intended to help them think otherwise.
Suzette Laboy AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:37 pm

The number of people getting colon cancer has fallen by 30 percent over the past decade in people over 50, and much of that progress is due to screening, a study finds.

But a substantial number of people in that target age group still haven't been screened, and a consortium of organizations say they're pushing to get 80 percent of those people screened at least once by 2018.

Read more

Pages