News
1:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Despite Details Of Bergdahl's Captivity, Answers Stay Scattered

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Technology
1:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

In A Landmark First, An AI Program Fools The Turing Test

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's been billed as a breakthrough in artificial intelligence - a computer in England has fooled human beings into thinking it is a 13-year-old boy, not by the way it looks, but by the way it chats through instant messaging. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports some analysts are unimpressed by this digital trickery.

AARTI SHAHANI, BYLINE: A team from the University of Reading put the computer through a test - it's called the Turing Test - and to pass it, the computer had to fool people.

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Education
1:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

With New Order, Obama Aims To Combat Student Debt Pressures

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:42 pm

President Obama is signing an executive order Monday, which will expand a loan forgiveness program for college debt. NPR's Mara Liasson looks at the program and the political salience of the issue.

Around the Nation
1:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

In Las Vegas Shootings, Some Suspect Roots In Anti-Government Militias

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:42 pm

A married couple apparently killed two police officers and another woman in Las Vegas. The husband and wife, also killed in the shooting, appear to have held anti-government and anti-law enforcement views.

The Salt
1:03 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

California Farmers Ask: Hey Buddy, Can You Spare Some Water?

Allen Peterson's farm, near the city of Turlock, Calif., lies next to a concrete-lined canal full of water. He's one of the lucky ones.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:29 am

Imagine if a gallon of milk cost $3 in your town, but 100 miles away it cost $100, or even $200.

Something similar is happening right now in California with water that farmers use to irrigate their crops. Some farmers are paying 50 or even 100 times more for that water than others who live just an hour's drive away.

The situation is provoking debate about whether water in California should move more freely, so that it can be sold to the highest bidder.

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Movie Interviews
12:33 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Invisible 'Supermensch' Avoided The Spotlight While Making Others Famous

In Supermensch, talent agent Shep Gordon recalls arriving in Los Angeles in 1968, dropping acid and getting slugged by a woman who later identified herself as Janis Joplin.
Dogwoof Films

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 1:48 pm

Shep Gordon's job is managing musicians and chefs and turning them into stars. Gordon created celebrities out of the likes of Alice Cooper and Anne Murray, but he says fame isn't necessarily a good thing.

"I made excuses to myself for how I made a living and tried to do it as honorably as I could, but I can't say that I'm proud," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. " ... If you make someone famous, they have to pay a price."

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The Salt
12:18 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Sandwich Monday: Taco Bell's Quesarito

Don't be fooled. This is no average burrito.
NPR

When you bite into a traditional burrito, your teeth have to endure one or two boring seconds of tortilla before they reach the filling within.

Taco Bell, continuing its mission to solve all of life's problems, has fixed that with the new Quesarito. It's a burrito that replaces the tortilla with a cheese-filled quesadilla.

Miles: What a revolutionary idea. I'm excited to see how a burrito tastes once you add some tortilla and cheese.

Robert: It's like a soft cast for a sprained burrito.

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NPR Story
11:58 am
Mon June 9, 2014

'All The Way' Wins Tony Award For Best Play

Robert Schenkkan’s “All The Way” has won the Tony Award for best play.

Starring Bryan Cranston, the play focuses on President Lyndon B. Johnson’s first year in office and explores both his fight for re-election and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Cranston, the former “Breaking Bad” star also nabbed the Tony for best lead actor in a play in his Broadway debut.

Also, after years of helping hand out Tony Awards to others, Neil Patrick Harris finally has one of his own.

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NPR Story
11:58 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Documentary Tells Story Of Landscape Design Pioneer Olmsted

Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed some of America's most well known green spaces, including Central Park, a green oasis in the middle of busy Manhattan. (PBS)

Nineteenth-century landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed some of America’s most well-known green spaces, including Central Park in New York City.

A new documentary, “Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America,” which premieres on PBS stations around the country on June 20, shows how Olmsted not only designed the city parks, but influenced the way America looked at landscape design.

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NPR Story
11:22 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Study Looks At What's Killing Centenarians

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 12:16 pm

The population of centenarians — people age 100 and over — is growing across the globe.

People over 100 years are expected to reach 3.2 million by 2050, according to a new study by Kings College in London.

The study, which examined the cause of death among the growing demographic, found that centenarians are less likely to die of cancer or heart disease at that age, and more likely to die from pneumonia or frail health.

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