Portland Area School Shooting
9:21 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Student, Suspect Dead In Oregon High School Shooting

Parents and family members gather at the Cherry Park Safeway in Troutdale, Oregon.
Amelia Templeton Oregon Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:14 pm

A shooter entered an Oregon high school with a rifle today and killed one student and injured a teacher, authorities said.

Troutdale Police Chief Scott Anderson said the shooter was later found dead, but he provided no detail as to how the shooter died. Anderson said they've identified the shooter but were not ready to release a name or more information.

Police and a SWAT team descended on Reynolds High School in the mid-morning hours, after receiving reports of a shooting.

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The Salt
9:04 am
Tue June 10, 2014

The Salad Frontier: Why Astronauts Need To Grow Lettuce In Space

Astronaut Steve "Swanny" Swanson tends to lettuce plants growing at the International Space Station that may one day make it into his salad.
Courtesy of NASA

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:14 pm

Have you ever craved a salad, I mean really craved a salad because you've been eating a lot of freeze-dried meat and beans?

Astronauts who spend months on end in space sure do miss their greens. That's why NASA is embarking on a program to get astronauts growing their own food. First stop is the International Space Station and a vegetable production system called Veg-01, or "Veggie."

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Shots - Health News
8:43 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Giving School Nurses Access To Medical Records Improves Care

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:17 am

School nurses today do a lot more than bandage skinned knees. They administer vaccines and medications, help diabetic students monitor their blood sugar, and prepare teachers to handle a student's seizure or asthma attack, among many other things.

"Chronic disease management is what school nurses spend most of their time doing," says Carolyn Duff, president of the National Association of School Nurses. "We do care for students in emergencies, but we spend more time planning to avoid emergencies."

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Parallels
8:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Western Countries Issue Warnings; Kenyan Tourism Gets Pummeled

Two customers sit having a drink in the Diani Sea resort in Diani, Kenya, outside Mombasa, on May 16. Travel advisories issued by Western countries are hitting Mombasa hard, forcing hotel closures and thousands of workers to lose their jobs.
Ivan Lieman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 4:43 pm

The Baobab Resort sits on the south coast of Kenya's Mombasa Island, but it has some of the homey feel of an old Catskills resort.

On a recent day, sounds from outside trickled into the resort's largest conference hall: children enjoying their last hour of daylight on the beach, staff members singing tunes from The Lion King, warming up for their evening show.

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Shots - Health News
8:17 am
Tue June 10, 2014

From Genes To Fangs: Snake Venom Recipes Remain Mysterious

Saw-scaled vipers may be small, but they pack a nasty venomous punch. This one, Echis carinatus sochureki, was used in a study on snake venom.
Courtesy of Wolfgang Wüster

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:46 am

When a saw-scaled viper sinks its fangs into a person, it isn't pretty.

Toxins attack the victim's capillaries. The body launches an immune defense, as it would with an infection. But that takes time — too much time. The venom quickly dissolves the tiny blood vessels, and the body runs out of clotting materials before it can repair them.

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Tue June 10, 2014

With Concern For Environment, Illinois Bans Microbeads

Researcher Sherri Mason looks for microbeads in a water sample from Lake Michigan.
Cheryl Corley

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:27 am

Illinois became the first state in the union to ban microbeads, the tiny bits of plastic found in consumer products like skin exfoliants and soap.

As NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, environmentalists say that when microbeads wash down the drain, they're usually missed by filtration systems, which means they become food to fish and other wildlife.

Cheryl filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Earthfix
7:42 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Not Much Refuge In Klamath Basin For Migratory Birds

Wildlife refuges in the Klamath Basin often feature a mixture of commercial agriculture and what remains of the historic wetlands.

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:06 am

This is the second part of a series on challenges facing wildlife refuges. Read part one here.

The nation’s original waterfowl refuge may be too dry this year to provide much hospitality for migratory birds arriving in the Klamath Basin.

You could blame it on the region's prolonged drought.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Drones Approved: FAA Gives OK To First Commercial Use Over Land

A 2011 photo shows an AeroVironment Puma drone being prepared for launch by University of Alaska researchers. The FAA says it approved BP's use of the drone to survey oil fields in Alaska.
Keith Cunningham AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:24 am

The Federal Aviation Administration says it has issued the first permit in its history for an unmanned aircraft to fly over U.S. soil. Oil company BP will use a drone from the company AeroVironment to conduct surveys in Alaska.

The first drone flights under the recently issued waiver have already taken place, the FAA says.

From the agency's news release:

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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Insurgent Group Claims Large Part Of Major Iraqi City

Armed Iraqi soldiers take their positions during clashes with militants in the northern city of Mosul, Iraq.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 4:46 pm

Overnight in Iraq, the al-Qaida splinter group ISIS overtook large parts of Mosul, one of the country's most populous cities. According to various media reports, insurgents overran government buildings, TV stations and military bases, forcing Iraqi soldiers and police to apparently flee their posts.

While the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is responsible for most of the violent attacks in Iraq, analysts say this one is significant.

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

We Said 'Tie', Listeners Told Us We Were Wrong

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Yesterday we reported on the U.S. men's soccer team as it heads to Brazil for the World Cup. Shortly afterwards, a scolding tweet came in over a misuse of some sports language. Soccer matches, we were told, don't tie, they draw. You also don't say two goals to nothing - it's two to nil. Like this...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Manchester United now they are stopped by two goals to nil.

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