News

On Tuesday, August 23rd, As It Was, JPR's daily series of audio vignettes on the history of southern Oregon and northern California will reach a significant milestone: 3,000 episodes!

Discussions of reproductive rights for women in America often quickly devolve and divide into "pro-choice" and "pro-life" sides. 

The concept of "reproductive justice" is meant to be much bigger than abortion, focusing on a whole range of issues facing women, minorities, and otherwise marginalized people. 

Loretta Ross and Toni M. Bond Leonard were present to create the term Reproductive Justice.  Ross is co-founder of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

Leonard is Past Board President of SisterSong, also Co-founder/former President-CEO of Black Women for Reproductive Justice.

They arrive in Ashland this week for a Friday session at the Shakespeare Festival, discussing and explaining the many concepts wrapped up in the term. 

Wikimedia

All things bee are celebrated on Saturday, August 20th, at the Oregon Honey Festival in Ashland. 

Our appreciation of pollination has grown in recent years, as bee numbers have continued to decline. 

Entomologist Dr. Lynn Royce has studied bee population declines, and her nonprofit Tree Hive Bees aims to put bees where they naturally belong: in trees. 

Even people and programs that celebrate history can make a bit of history themselves. 

So it is with "As It Was," the two-minute regional history program that airs weekdays on JPR (and immediately following the second hour of the Exchange). 

The current series of "As It Was" airs its 3,000th installment next week.  And the people involved still like doing it. 

ODF

Life returned to normal in areas around the Redwood Highway Fire on Saturday. 

By evening, firefighters had the fire nearly contained, and evacuation orders were being relaxed.

ODF

Saturday, 8:30 AM: Three homes and at least five outbuildings destroyed by the fire.  The fire itself at 85 percent containment, kept to roughly 50 acres.  One spot fire extinguished downwind from main fire.  Deer Creek Road still closed, evacuations and road closures to be evaluated later in the day.

Edward J. O'Neill/National Fish and Wildlife Service

Upper Klamath Lake is full of food for fish. 

So it's a bit of a mystery why big fish like redband trout leave the lake and head into its tributaries, where there's less food. 

Oregon Fish and Wildlife has a new tool in potentially solving the mystery: radio tags in the fish.  The tags will help ODFW track fish movements in and around the lake. 

Wikimedia

The plight of bees in recent years produced a swelling of concern about pollinators. 

Bees are not the only pollinators, and the others have problems, too. 

Take the monarch butterfly, for example.  A report published last month by the Xerces Society in Portland shows a huge drop in monarchs gathering at winter sites in California, down 74% in two decades. 

Willamettans Family Nudist Resort

On those hot sticky days, some of us wonder why we wear clothes at all.  Then there are the people who stopped wondering years ago. 

Nudists gather in Springfield this week for the annual convention of the American Association for Nude Recreation

As the name implies, members spend plenty of time in the nude--they hasten to add, in appropriate places. 

MatthewDiffee.com

There are cartoonists, and then there are New Yorker cartoonists. 

Getting a cartoon into the famous magazine is a mark of success, one Matthew Diffee has received many times over.  He is also the winner of a Reuben Award, something like a cartoonist's Oscar. 

Matt Diffee and his new book Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People show up together at the Eugene Library on Saturday at 2 PM. 

Northwest Seniors Caught In Housing Affordability Squeeze

Aug 10, 2016
Ruby DeLuna/KUOW

As the housing markets heat up in Northwest cities such as Portland and Seattle, retiring Baby Boomers are feeling the squeeze. Here's the story of a Seattle man who’s been displaced by rising rents. 

Jami Dwyer/Wikimedia

When and where to cut trees is a constant topic of debate in our part of the world. 

In other areas, it's less a debate than a mourning process, as vast areas that were once forest become agricultural land... minus the trees. 

Researchers Yann le Polain de Waroux (Stanford) and Rachael Garrett (Boston U.) studied the process in parts of Latin America. 

Wikimedia

One of the more spectacular movies of the silent era is largely a product of Oregon. 

"The General," Buster Keaton's film commemorating a famous railroad chase during the Civil War, was shot on a now-abandoned railroad east of Cottage Grove. 

Now the film is coming home, so to speak, on a tour of Oregon with spanking-new score by Portland composer Mark Orton.  "Score" in this sense means performed LIVE while the film plays on the screen.

Nudists gather in Eugene for a national convention, and an Ashland bookstore feuds with the Shakespeare Festival over banned books. 

Seems like a VENTSday topic to us: whether it's books or bodies, where and when is censorship appropriate? 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

11 different acts are booked for the West Coast Country Music Festival this weekend near Ashland.  At least one had to get parental permission to attend.

And Rainy and The Rattlesnakes got that permission... because Dad is one of the Rattlesnakes. 

Rainy Miatke is the title performer; she and sister Lela started playing instruments before they were ten, and formed a band with their dad, Ray, soon after. Lucas Brinkerhoff plays bass for the group. 

BLM

The feel of the Old West came through in the novels of Zane Grey. 

Grey came to love the Rogue River Valley, and built himself a cabin near the river.  The cabin recently earned designation on the National Register of Historic Places, giving it a firmer shot at survival. 

The Bureau of Land Management has been owner of the cabin for much of the last decade. 

Should nurses be allowed to work like doctors at the VA?

Aug 8, 2016
ASSOCIATION OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NURSE ANESTHETISTS

Nurses may soon do work doctors normally do at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

This includes nurses performing work that anesthesiologists have been doing – and that has some physicians concerned.

BLM

Animal rights activists and the Bureau of Land Management have clashed for years over the proper management of wild horses in the West. 

Now the clash is potentially headed for court over BLM's proposal to provide surgical birth control to mares currently held in Oregon. 

That prompted Front Range Equine Rescue to file suit in federal court. 

Wikimedia

  Tests at two Medford elementary schools (Jackson and Roosevelt) recently found elevated lead levels in the water. 

Which would be a source of concern in any school, but perhaps even more at these two.  Because both had undergone extensive remodeling in the last decade, with replacement of much of the plumbing. 

Bottled water during summer activities provides a short-term solution. 

Southern Oregon University has been dealing with very similar issues. 

Research: Cascadia Quake Could Hit Sooner Than We Thought

Aug 8, 2016
Cassandra Profita/EarthFix

A new analysis by researchers in Oregon, Spain and British Columbia, Canada, suggests that massive earthquakes on northern sections of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, affecting areas of the Pacific Northwest that are more heavily populated, are somewhat more frequent than has been believed in the past.

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