News

inciweb.gov

Rain.  The word itself sounds pretty after a long stretch of hot weather and fires and smoke. 

And it began falling in the region over the weekend (September 17th), giving hope that the worst of the fires and smoky conditions might be behind us. 

That's not necessarily true, as fire managers remind us.  October can be a big fire month, too, and has been in several fire seasons. 

"Earth Seasoned" Facebook page

We can all stand to learn a few things from nature.  For a young woman named Tori, nature was her primary teacher for most of a year. 

Tori has been diagnosed with dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, and short-term memory problems. 

She and four other young women spent a year in the Oregon Cascades, living very close to the land. 

The story is told in the documentary film "Earth Seasoned," one of the films in this year's Jefferson State FlixxFest in the Scott Valley. 

inciweb.nwcg.gov

The dozens of fires burning in the Northwest this summer forced thousands of people from their homes and cast clouds of heavy smoke that kept residents inside and ruined untold numbers of vacations. That’s led to some vigorous finger-pointing on editorial pages, talk radio and social media. JPR asked some forest experts for a reality check.

Public Domain

More than half the population, yet still not equal in pay and other measures.  Women still have some gender biases to overcome. 

Those and many other issues are addressed at the Women With Wings conferences held across the country, including in Ashland next month (October 19-22). 

Di Strachan and Nancy Swift of Jefferson Economic Development Institute (JEDI) are among the speakers. 

Oregon Blue Book

Do you even know what your grandparents did for a living?  Bill Nicholson does, because he does it too. 

He is the third generation of his family to farm Nicholson Ranch in Fort Klamath.  And the ranch has just been recognized by the Oregon Farm Bureau's Century Farm & Ranch program, honoring places where people have worked the land for 100 years. 

There's even a Sesquicentennial Award for operations continuing for 150 years. 

Wikimedia

The Mount Shasta organization known as W.A.T.E.R. chose a name that stands for "We Advocate Thorough Environmental Review." 

And its members got their wish: an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) on the plan for Crystal Geyser's water bottling plant in Mount Shasta. 

The EIR is now out, sure to gladden some hearts and impact others adversely. 

Rick Bowmer/AP

40 filmed features and shorts are crammed into just three days at the Klamath Independent Film Festival, coming to Klamath Falls next weekend (Sept. 15-17). 

And they are all by or about people in Oregon and Northern California. 

The KIFF offerings include the Oregon premiere of "No Man's Land," a documentary about the armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in early 2016. 

JPR Rhythm & News Frequency Now At 97.5 FM

Sep 14, 2017

Updated 9/26/2017 | 9:00 am -- JPR's Rhythm & News service is now at 97.5 FM. Over the next few weeks our engineer will continue to work to improve the signal with additional equipment and tuning.

Nicholas Blah/Flickr

What are you doing next week?  More important, how will you get to where you're doing it?  This is an important question for the last two weeks of September, the period of the Oregon Drive Less Challenge.

People all over the state are urged to walk, or bike, or take public transportation instead of driving. 

And there are incentives... prizes that can be earned through effective reductions in driving. 

Rogue Valley Transportation District (RVTD) and the City of Eugene are on board. 

News from around the world in an instant.  New movies for fall.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

The Classics & News service at 101.5 FM in Grants Pass will be off the air for several hours this afternoon while our engineer is working at the site. Service should return to normal by this evening.

During this outage you can listen online using the listen live feature at the top of the page.

Thanks for your patience!

Chetco Bar Fire Is A Sleeping Giant — For Now

Sep 12, 2017
NW IMT No. 13/Inciweb

“It seems like the fire went to sleep,” said Cave Junction resident Heather Newman, as she examined a fire map Sunday night during a community meeting held at Illinois Valley High School. “I just hope this sleeping giant doesn’t wake up.”

The world of American roots music is no stranger to Seattle songwriter Sera Cahoone. Even though her last three albums were on Sub Pop Records and she spent years at the top of the indie charts, she’s always had a streak of Americana that ran through her music, a love of the humble folk song that bolstered her art. She’s returned now to these earliest influences with her new album, From Where I Started.

Annette Teng, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=52465073

Vaux's swifts migrate through the west coast while on their way to Central and South America every summer.

In Western Oregon, they stop to roost in old hollow snags and chimneys every evening in September. People bring lawn chairs and picnic blankets to watch the spectacle of hundreds, sometimes thousands, of tiny black birds swirling around a chimney until diving in, all the while dodging preying hawks. 

But the trees and chimneys favored by the birds are getting harder to find these days, and the birds' numbers are dropping. 

Wikimedia

Even if you never drive past a vineyard, it's easy to spot evidence of a growing wine industry in Oregon. 

Just check out the "Oregon" racks in the wine section of the grocery store. 

The Southern Oregon University Research Center--SOURCE--recently completed a Wine & Vineyard Census, commissioned by the Oregon Wine Board.

Eva Skuratowicz and Rikki Pritzlaff are the researchers.

Tristan Loper, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48424363

Dar Williams is one of a kind, so a little hard to categorize.  Sure, she is a singer and a songwriter, and highly regarded for her pop/folk work. 

But she's a writer, too, with a new book out called What I Found in A Thousand Towns.  It details the changes she sees in communities she has visited in years of touring. 

Evelyn Simak, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13063303

Trying to understand the world of legal marijuana in Oregon is enough to drive people to wine. 

Marijuana IS legal for personal as well as medical use (though still illegal under federal law), it can be grown, and it is regulated--sometimes heavily--by state and local authorities. 

We work through some of the issues with marijuana cultivation and production in a discussion with several people. 

California Lawmakers To Vote On Final Edits To Marijuana Regulation

Sep 11, 2017
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio / File

California lawmakers are set to vote this week on a few final edits concerning the legal sale of marijuana. It’s the legislature’s last chance to make tweaks before the state starts issuing licenses in January.

The proposal follows a big effort earlier this year to align the state’s rules on medical and recreational pot. And it would allow one storefront to sell both. 

Lillie Mae has been singing and playing on stages across the country since she could stand on her own two feet. Forever and Then Some, her much anticipated Third Man Records debut, sees the Nashville-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist weaving her own extraordinary experiences with the myriad strains of Americana to create a breathtaking song cycle of romance and struggle, solitude and adventure.

SOU Hannon Library

The history of Southern Oregon is intimately connected to a few industries- logging, mining, and agriculture. These “heritage industries,” are crucial to understanding the culture of many communities in the region. This is a story about one woman who works to preserve the history of Southern Oregon’s heritage industries, in a moment of transformation.

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