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Josh Thompson/Wikimedia Commons

Some TV ad watchers might have been confused this weekend when they saw a Gavin Newsom for Governor advertisement.

Brian Turner via Flickr

Our society oscillates in our approach to criminal justice, between punishment and rehabilitation. 

The concept of "restorative justice" takes rehabilitation a step further.  It involves healing the harm done by crime, when possible, and re-integrating offenders into society, sometimes with face-to-face meetings between people on both ends of a criminal act. 

The Resolve Center for Dispute Resolution and Restorative Justice in Medford (formerly Mediation Works) organized the upcoming Northwest Justice Forum.  Restorative justice is central to the mission of the forum. 

U of California

Latinos are California's largest single minority group.  But Latinos can be hard to find among the faculty and administration of California's public colleges, both two- and four-year. 

And that's not the only group under-represented.  69% of students are diverse, but 60% of college faculty and senior leadership are white. 

The Campaign for College Opportunity documents the trends in a recent report

Alexander Novati/Wikimedia

The imprisoning of Japanese-Americans in prison camps during World War II is an enduring stain on the country.  We still struggle to understand the actions and motivations of the time. 

Much of the attention focuses on people leaving their homes and living in the camps. 

But what happened after they were released?  That's the approach taken in the book Life After Manzanar by Naomi Hirahara and Heather Lindquist. 

People released from camps got 25 dollars and a bus ticket. 

Acting may be fun and rewarding work, but it requires a lot of the actor; preparation, audition, rehearsal, and more. 

Theatre professionals Jackie Apodaca and Michael Kostroff shared an advice column for working or nearly-working actors for a decade in "Backstage," a trade paper.  They compiled some of their best work in the book Answers from "The Working Actor": Two Backstage Columnists Share Ten Years of Advice

Jackie Apodaca is a professor in the theatre department at Southern Oregon University.  Michael Kostroff is an actor and a teacher as well. 

Tracking The Extinct Giants Of Oregon

Apr 30, 2018
University of Oregon

Giants once roamed the Earth in our region.  Mammoths and mastodons, elephant-like creatures, were common until humans hunted them to extinction. 

Evidence of their presence can still be found, including mammoth tracks on a dry lake bed in Lake County (Oregon).  University of Oregon paleontologist Gregory Retallack has been investigating the tracks, which indicate mammoths traveling in a group (and one might have been limping). 

Wikimedia

We're urged to "think globally, act locally," but climate change is still a massive thing to wrap our minds around. 

How DO we express our concerns at the local level in ways that make a difference?  Mary DeMocker, co-founder of the Eugene chapter of 350.org, has a few ideas for you.  She is the author of The Parents’ Guide to Climate Revolution: 100 Ways to Build a Fossil Free Future, Raise Empowered Kids, and Still Get a Good Night's Sleep

You might tell from the title that the book is both serious and lighthearted. 

Gavin Newsom’s False claim he was ‘first to take on the NRA and win’

Apr 27, 2018

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

There’s no doubting Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s credentials as a strong gun control backer.

Featured Works for May – First Concert
(*Indicates May birthday)

May 1 T William Lawes*: Royal Consort Sett No. 9
May 2 W Jacques Ibert: Concertino da Camera
May 3 T Ernest Bloch: Schelomo
May 4 F Joseph Haydn: Symphony No. 104

On Tuesday, April 24th, NPR announced Naia Izumi as the winner of the NPR Tiny Desk Contest. Izumi was chosen from a pool of over 5,000 entries from all 50 states. Here at JPR, we wanted to once again feature our favorite regional submission, and this year's honor goes to singer/songwriter Hannah Mayree!

Drawing from diverse influences ranging from John Hartford, Joanna Newsom, Pete Seeger and Townes Van Zandt, Hollis Peach weaves evocative, mischievous and deeply personal stories in the American vernacular of song and story.

Leslie McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Lots of us work in restaurants at some point in our lives.  And at the moment, it's one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy. 

Also one of the most likely to spur complaints of sexual harassment.  The Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United) tracks issues for restaurant workers, and has plenty to report on the prevalence of sexual harassment. 

Did you leave your brolly in the boot of your car?  If the phrase makes immediate sense, you might be British. 

We share a language with the United Kingdom, but there are many differences in the version we speak in the United States. 

Lynne Murphy is perfectly situated to research and write about the differences, being from here and living there, in England.  Her blog "Separated by a Common Language" grew into a book, The Prodigal Tongue

Some California Farmers Already Feeling Impacts Of Possible Tariffs

Apr 27, 2018
Jill111/Pixabay

China says it welcomes a planned visit by U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin next week amid trade tensions. Both countries have proposed tariffs of $50 billion on each other's products. That includes steel and aluminum from China and wine, almonds and cherries from California.

There’s A Cure For Hepatitis C, But Oregon Limits Access

Apr 27, 2018
Amelia Templeton/OPB

The opioid epidemic is spreading hepatitis C, a chronic liver disease often contracted by drug users sharing needles. A new class of drugs can cure it. But the State of Oregon limits who can get the treatment.

Jefferson Public Radio's newsroom is among the winners of the 2018 regional Edward R. Murrow Awards. The Murrows are presented by the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) to recognize outstanding broadcast and online journalism. 

siskiyousingers.org

They may be beautiful, but they came from ugly circumstances.  Spirituals are, at heart, songs from slavery in America. 

And Ashland-based Siskiyou Singers present a program of them in two concerts this weekend, "Who’ll Be a Witness: The Power of the American Spiritual." 

Performances Saturday and Sunday will be narrated by Eileen Guenther, who wrote In Their Own Words: Slave Life and the Power of Spirituals

Oregon Voter's Pamphlet

The occupant of the Oregon State Senate District 3 seat will change this fall, for the second time in a little more than two years.

Alan Bates died in office in the late summer of 2016; Alan DeBoer won the special election for a two-year term but opted not to run again.

A flock of candidates from both parties filed for the open seat. Today we visit with the two Republicans filed, Curt Ankerberg and Jessica Gomez

Oregon officials have hired outside lawyers to investigate allegations of discrimination, harassment and abusive behavior at the state's economic development agency. 

Earlier this week, records show Oregon Department of Justice officials signed a $50,000 contract with the law firm Perkins Coie LLP. Under the agreement, "special assistant attorneys general" at the firm will investigate anonymous complaints made in early April against leaders of Business Oregon

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Two new TV ads paint rosy biographical pictures of the top Democrats in the race for California governor. But how accurate are these ads?

PolitiFact California examined the 30-second spots for Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

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