Riccardo Rossi,

It surprised nearly no one when the federal Marine Fisheries service announced (on Feb. 27) a 12-month review to consider listing Klamath River Spring Chinook Salmon for endangered species protection. 

Several salmonid species are struggling, as demonstrated in the report by Cal Trout called "Fish in Hot Water" released last year. 

Peter Moyle from Cal Trout recently spoke to the state water board for the North Coast about fish issues.  Craig Tucker is Natural Resources Policy Advocate for the Karuk Tribe.

Christopher Michel/Wikimedia

Having people pop up from behind the furniture and shout SURPRISE can change your day. 

But it's also possible that getting other kinds of surprises can change your mind, and permanently. 

Southern Oregon University Professor Michael Rousell has been exploring the effects of surprises. 

And he's found evidence that the right kind of surprise can lead people to change their beliefs. 

Recent Oregon Storms Bring Improvement To Snowpack, Water Supply

Mar 5, 2018
Zach Urness/Statesman Journal

What a difference two weeks makes.

The assault of cold weather and snow brought major improvement to Oregon’s snowpack and water supply after earlier concerns about drought.

Shasta County Sheriff's Office Facebook page

Some residents of the Happy Valley area of Andersonville, California will have to evacuate their homes Monday and Happy Valley Elementary School will be closed. That’s to allow the Shasta County Sheriff’s Office to burn a barn where new homeowners recently discovered several hundred pounds of explosives.

Remembering Steve Nelson

Mar 3, 2018

Last week, JPR lost a special member of our family. Steve Nelson was president of the JPR Foundation for the past 19 years – and one of our biggest fans.

Service Alert for 91.5 Eureka

Mar 2, 2018

Our News & Information service in Eureka is currently experiencing problems. Our engineer is looking into the issue and will have service restored as soon as possible.

You can hear all three of our services using our Listen Live feature located at the top of the page. In the meantime, we appreciate your patience!


Following the news closely is stressful. Something traumatic seems to happen every day; if not at home, then abroad.

Can we adjust our news diets to stay both informed and, well, sane?

Longtime journalist Peter Laufer, of Eugene, authored Slow News: A Manifesto for the Critical News Consumer in 2014.


We do love our motor vehicles in America.  And in a region like ours, far-flung and thinly populated, we often can't live without 'em. 

So it's plenty stressful when our cars and trucks begin to act up or act strangely. 

Zach Edwards has seen plenty of strange vehicle behavior in his years working on cars and owning Ashland Automotive

He visits once a month to take listeners calls and emails on automotive issues, in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.  This month, we focus on the differences between four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive. 


Oregon's foster care system for children needs a lot of work, there's general agreement on that.  A lawsuit against the state revealed issues caused by shortages of parents and caseworkers, like children being kept in motels instead of private homes. 

An audit by the secretary of state revealed these and other issues.  So what will it take to patch the holes, and can enough foster parents be found to ensure that all children entering care are welcomed into safe environments? 

The Wood Brothers’ sixth outing, ‘One Drop of Truth,’ dives headfirst into a deep wellspring of sounds, styles and influences. Whereas their previous outings have often followed a conceptual and sonic through-line, here the long-standing trio featuring brothers Oliver and Chris Wood along with Jano Rix treat each song as if it were its own short film. The end result is undeniably The Wood Brothers’ most dynamic recording to date.

Randall Theatre Company

Is it March already?  Oh yeah, February is a very short month.  Which just means we get to celebrate the arts once again in our First Friday Arts Segment, just four weeks after the last time. 

We offer a series of chats on arts events coming to towns around the region, but it's all audience-driven: the phone calls make the segment. 

Call 800-838-3760 to be one of the participants; tell the audience about an event in the performing or visual arts coming soon. 


Any choral group can fill a concert, or a series of them, with works by the old masters. 

But there are new masters, too, and Southern Oregon Repertory Singers intend to showcase them in "First Light: The James M. Collier New Works Festival," this weekend in Ashland. 

SORS musical director Paul French gathered choral works new and nearly-new for the concerts. 

Local Fire Agencies In California Want More Money As Fire Season Lengthens

Mar 1, 2018
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Local fire agencies in California are asking state lawmakers for more money to keep pace with longer, more devastating fire seasons.

At a hearing at the state Capitol on Tuesday, local fire agencies petitioned lawmakers for $100 million, after last year’s fire season extended into December and spawned five of the most destructive wildfires in state history.

The early years of gray wolves returning to the region are proving to be interesting, to say the least.  Wolf packs are now established west of the Cascades in both Oregon and California

In fact, not long after Oregon wildlife biologists got a radio collar on female wolf OR-54 of the Rogue Pack, she left for California and stayed there for a while.  She's since returned. 

We gather workers from Fish & Wildlife in both states for some updates on wolf management and its many challenges. 

NASA/Public Domain

Ashlander Michael Niemann's knowledge of the world helps him in multiple ways. 

He teaches world politics and human rights among other international subjects at Southern Oregon University. 

And he writes novels set in other countries. 

Those include a recent release, the thriller Illegal Holdings, which features the exploits of Niemann's recurring character, Valentin Vermeulin.  Spies and foreign cultures are characters in the book. 


We have yet to find a musical genre that Josh Gross does not like. 

His enthusiasm for music in all forms is infectious, and reflected in his music columns and articles in the Rogue Valley Messenger

So we borrow that enthusiasm once a month, for our own Rogue Sounds segment.  Josh Gross returns to talk about the works and local appearances of a handful of bands. 

Researchers Say Climate Change Could Significantly Reduce California Crop Yields By 2050

Feb 28, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Climate change could decrease the yield of some crops in California by up to 40 percent by 2050. That’s a big deal for farmers growing more than 400 commodities.

Tapan Pathak, a UC Cooperative Extension specialist based in Merced, and his research team analyzed more than 90 studies on climate change and discovered that warming temperatures may alter where crops grow across California. Their findings were published in Agronomy Journal.

Bureau of Land Management

2018 figures to be a big year for the Klamath River Renewal Corporation

KRRC is the new entity set up to take ownership of the four hydro dams on the Klamath River slated for removal. 

Most of the staff will be hired by this year, and the process of hiring companies and people to do the dam removal work is also scheduled.  Dam demolition will start in two years, on the current timeline. 

Dave Meurer, as community liaison for the KRRC, has the task of keeping the public up to speed on the massive project. 

Film Shasta

Who needs Hollywood when you've got Redding and environs? 

Film Shasta is set up to encourage filmmakers to shoot their projects in Shasta County.  And it appears to be working... 2017 was a record year for film work in the county, with an estimated $650,000 or more in economic impact on the region. 

Sabrina Jurisich is the Shasta County Film Commissioner. 


Ten million people live in Los Angeles County, the biggest in California.  Humboldt County has somewhat fewer, at a bit more than 134,000. 

So Humboldt and 34 other counties band together to bring their concerns to the attention of state legislators, as the Rural County Representatives of California, RCRC. 

And Humboldt County has the potential for a bit more attention, now that County Supervisor Rex Bohn chairs RCRC.