News

Some Lawmakers, Water Agencies Push To End California Drought Restrictions

Feb 6, 2017
planetlight / Flickr

A group of Republican state lawmakers and Northern California water agencies are pushing for an end to statewide drought restrictions given the wet winter.

The State Water Resources Control Board is meeting Wednesday to vote on extending emergency regulations.

Jason Kasper, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4067638

It's a big step, choosing to teach a child at home rather than sending him or her to school. 

There are requirements to measure what home-school students learn, but parents have a lot of latitude in deciding what and how to teach. 

For those who feel a bit overwhelmed, there are resources available, both from the public school system, and from the likes of the Cascadia Learning Cooperative

Wikimedia

The days of hiding in the shadows are largely over for members of the LGBTQ community.  Or are they?

Society's attitudes toward people who are not strictly heterosexual have changed, but over a long time, and with a lot of pressure from a lot of people. 

And they all have stories to tell, stories being collected by the Coming Out Project

BASF

Isn't there just ONE thing you'd like to see changed in our food through genetic engineering?  For a lot of people, the answer is a resounding NO. 

It is a selling point to be GMO-free.  But GMO true believers stick by their (gene) guns. 

Environmental journalist McKay Jenkins visited with them and a lot of people on both sides for his book Food Fight: GMOs and the Future of the American Diet. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

The ocean's mysteries are largely uncharted. We do know many of its creatures are delicious.

Yet the unknowns can multiply (or bioaccumulate), when something edible makes the trip from sea to plate.

Jennifer Burns Bright is a food writer who explores these issues, and our collective taste for the deep and briny.

She's based in Port Orford and the leader of an Oregon Humanities Conversation project about the traditions and challenges of seafood in Oregon.

Ashland Automotive

What ails your car?  Zach Edwards can't fix a car over the phone, but he can certainly try to diagnose the problem. 

This month we focus on how to decide if you should sell or fix an ailing car.

Zach is the proprietor of Ashland Automotive, and our monthly visitor for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.

Wikimedia Commons

Reading a pesticide label is a bit like plunging headlong into a foreign language, one with a fast-changing vocabulary. For example: neonicotinoids.

They're a relatively new class of pesticides, favored now because they cause less toxicity in birds and mammals than insects. But that's not good news for pollinators.

Two pesticide experts join us to translate what neonic pesticides mean for the insects who actually help plants grow.  Aimée Code is Pesticide Program Director for The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Dr. Susan Kegley heads up the Pesticide Research Institute.

JPR News

Since the November election, some of our friends and neighbors speak in terms of "resistance." 

There's a similar message in the musical program "Resist," but the work pre-dates the election. 

Southern Oregon percussion duo Caballito Negro, previous guests of The Exchange, join forces with Left Edge Percussion for a concert that features flutes, "a truckload of percussion," spoken word, film, and images. 

The concert is Thursday, February 9th. 

Cephas, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27124271

The First Friday in February has arrived, and with it, a look ahead to a passel of performances and exhibitions in the arts. 

We call it our First Friday Arts segment, a call-driven segment where YOU are the guest. 

If you have an event on stage or gallery or screen to report, tell the rest of the audience, at 800-838-3760. 

You'll be talking to listeners from Mendocino to Eugene. 

Siskiyou Music Project

Complete this sentence: "Moon River, wider _____________."  If you said "than a mile," you're familiar with the music of Johnny Mercer. 

His songs form the heart of a program coming to the stage on February 18th, with vocals by Chris Williams and guitar by Ed Dunsavage. 

It is the kickoff to an entire season of performances from the Siskiyou Music Project

Wikimedia/JPArt

Think of some of the great lines in literature, like "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn."

Now try to imagine those lines delivered by text message.  Would they be the same? 

In the hands of Mallory Ortberg, they are hilarious.  She wrote a book a few years back called Texts from Jane Eyre, with imaginary electronic messages back and forth between some of the major characters in literature. 

Where Do NW Members Of Congress Stand On Trump's Immigration Order?

Feb 2, 2017
Gabriella Demczuk for NPR

On Jan. 31, President Trump signed an executive order suspending new-refugee admissions for 120 days and blocking travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days. Syrian refugees are banned indefinitely.

Lawmaker Withdraws Bill Which Called For Sale Of Public Lands

Feb 2, 2017
chaffetz.house.gov

After public outcry, the lawmaker who introduced a bill to sell 3.3 million acres of public land nationwide — including 70,000 acres in Oregon — has decided to reverse course.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

The federal government has fined more than 750 hospitals across the country for scoring in the bottom 25 percent on measures of patient safety. Hospital-acquired infections, blood clots, falls and bedsores are among the avoidable injuries to patients included in the annual ranking by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The program is meant to prod hospitals to improve patient safety. But hospital officials say the rating system doesn’t paint an accurate picture of patient care.

DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

In an age of "libtards" and "cuckservatives," is there any reason to believe we can conduct our discussions of government more with more civility?  The Institute for Civility in Government thinks so. 

The institute's name is its mission, a tall order in a time when opposite sides of an argument don't even agree on the facts. 

The Rev. Cassandra Dahnke is the co-founder of the institute. 

U.S. Fish & Wildlife

At one time, the number of California condors could be counted on the hands of just three people. 

The bird--largest land bird in North America--was that close to extinction.  Now it numbers in the hundreds, both in captivity and in the wild. 

And plans to reintroduce condors to their historic habitat continue, most notably with a plan to bring the birds to Redwood National Park. 

It's a joint project of many partners, including US Fish & Wildife, the National Park Service, and the Yurok tribe. 

Wikimedia

Josh Gross has an addiction, and it's one we're only too happy to share. 

He loves music, and across a wide spectrum of genres and styles. 

Josh makes music, and writes about music for the Rogue Messenger.  And once a month, he visits the studio with "Rogue Sounds," a compilation of musical samples and news of coming band dates. 

For Refugees In Eugene, Trumps Immigration Order Threatens To Split Families

Jan 31, 2017
Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard

Hussain Rachou is scared.

A Eugene resident for a year, he’s been safe since mid-2015 from the violence that has gripped his home country of Syria. But Rachou, a Kurdish Muslim, hasn’t seen his wife and two sons since the U.S. State Department approved his work visa and sent him to the United States 19 months ago.

Wikimedia

The announcement of a choice for Supreme Court justice is always a big deal.  

President Trump made it that much bigger by making the announcement in prime TV time.  

The decisions of the Supreme Court (SCOTUS) may not be actually set in stone, but they can certainly affect American law for generations.  

University of Oregon political scientist Alison Gash focuses on courts and rights in her work.  

Wikimedia

Two words from the presidential campaign linger into the early days of the Trump administration: "the wall." 

The president continues to talk of strengthening security on the border with Mexico, and addresses it directly in an executive order from January 25th.  

That order also includes wording about rounding up people who have already entered the United States illegally.  

People like Ricardo Lujan, a Southern Oregon University student who was brought into the U.S. at age 9.  

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