News

Navy Relaxes Tattoo Policy To Recruit More Millennials

May 11, 2016
AMERICAN HOMEFRONT/SOPHIE MCKIBBEN

Effective this month, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the U.S. Navy can ink a lot more of their body.

The Navy's latest policy change is an effort to remain attractive to millennials who may be excluded from serving due to the size of their body artwork.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife

A couple of phone calls this week--well before fire season--confirmed that when people see smoke in the hills, they worry. 

But the smoke they saw (on May 10th) was from a controlled burn in the Ashland watershed, part of AFR, the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project. 

There is a science to getting forests to burn ONLY where you want them to burn, and agencies share information on that science through Prescribed Fire Training Exchanges

Pentimento Press

Thanks to the rains brought by El Niño, California gets a bit of a break from drought politics this year.  But memories of last year are still fresh: sharp reductions in water use by homeowners and public entities, while agriculture uses most of the state's water. 

In Water, More or Less, journalist Rita Schmidt Sudman and artist Stephanie Taylor track changes in California water policy and make suggestions for future moves. 

Amanda Peacher/OPB

The occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge ended more than three months ago, but the rhetoric of the occupiers is showing up in a number of candidate campaigns this primary season.

Many of those candidates are part of the self-described “patriot” movement, which includes groups like Oregon III% and the Oath Keepers, all part of the Pacific Patriots Network. Many of the more than a dozen patriot candidates share some of the ideology and values of the leaders of the occupation of the Malheur refuge and filed to run for office after the occupation began.

guernicamag.org

Our discussion about the Roe vs Wade abortion case (8 AM Wednesday) sparks the subject matter of this week's VENTSday segment. 

Join in the discussion with 1) your experience with unintended pregnancy; 2) how society should provide for children who ARE born--food? Preschool?  College?    

Listeners take stage on our weekly VENTSday segment, a chance to vent on a couple of topics in the news--by phone, by email, or through our online survey. We provide the topics, you provide the opinions.

Your thoughts are front and center on VENTSday. No expertise necessary; just opinions and the ability to express them in a radio-friendly way. We post our weekly survey on one or both of the topics in advance.

Alex Cox via Hannon Library

Whether it's on paper, on a big screen, or on a mobile device, we're often just looking for stories. 

Our parents read them to us as kids, and the habit sticks around.  Tod Davies is all about the story.  She's written some big ones, like the screenplay for the movie "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," and is the editorial director at Exterminating Angel Press.

Hannon Library at Southern Oregon University brings Davies in for a chat on "The Importance of Story," Thursday (May 12) at 4 PM. 

USDA/Public Domain

It's not quite like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, but we do create life from death. 

In our compost piles, that is.  Truly, we can enrich our gardens and yards through the decay of once-living matter. 

Rodney Bloom from the OSU Extension Service offers a program called "Decay for the Masses," with a session coming up Sunday in Eugene. 

Wikimedia

We love to eat, that much is clear. 

One clear indicator: we love to talk about food.  And another chance to do just that is offered by the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project event called "We Are What We Eat: Connecting Food and Citizenship."

The chat will be offered for free at the Illinois Valley Branch of Josephine Community Libraries Friday (May 13th) at 5 PM. 

Allen Alley Campaign

You'd need a small bus to carry all the people running for Oregon Governor in the May 17th primary. 

John Kitzhaber's departure a month into his term put Kate Brown in office and triggered an unusual election for a two-year term in this election cycle. 

Former state Republican chair Allen Alley is one of a handful of GOP members running. 

His chief opponent, Bud Pierce, joined us previously. 

Alena Kravchenko/Wikimedia

We respect, if not revere, scientists and their work in our society.  We also do not entirely trust them.  How's that again?  Case in point: climate change... scientists demonstrate it, but some people reject it.

Oregon Humanities explores that situation and others in one of its Conversation Project programs, "In Science We Trust? The Role of Science in a Democracy." 

Gail Wells is the program leader, bringing it to Selma later this week (May 13th). 

Wikimedia

Somehow, one of the richest countries on Earth has difficulty feeding all of its people adequately.

So we have SNAP ("food stamps"), food banks, and many program providing food for people who have trouble affording it. 

Ashland is the site of the annual Empty Bowls fundraiser to bring in money for local program addressing hunger. 

Pam Marsh from the Ashland Emergency Food Bank and Maren Faye from Uncle Food's Diner visit to explain the impact of the fundraiser. 

BLM

Federal land managers labored long and hard on their latest plan for the 2.6 million acres in western Oregon known as the O&C lands.

And they admit it was crafted, at least in part, to avoid protracted legal battles.

But the plan hadn’t even been officially released yet when it began gathering threats of lawsuits from all sides. 

Geoff Ridden/Facebook

The first Friday of any month has become a day to celebrate the arts around our region. 

Several communities hold First Friday art walks, and some hold similar observances on other weekend days. 

The Exchange syncs up with the art world on First Friday, by visiting with listeners about arts events in the coming month.  Want to know what events are coming, or let people know?  Here's your chance.

Northwest Women Writers Symposium

Reyna Grande garnered critical acclaim and awards for her first two novels. 

Then she turned her focus on herself for a memoir about her illegal immigration to the United States as a child, The Distance Between Us.  She is now a U.S. citizen, beneficiary of an amnesty program.

The book will be re-released in an edition for younger readers this fall, long after her appearance this weekend at Northwest Women Writers Symposium events in Eugene. 

Updated 5/9/2016 9:15 am -- We have ordered a replacement module and will install it as soon as it arrives.

Updated 5/6/2016 3:40 pm -- We are able order the part to repair the tower on Monday and will complete repairs as soon as the part arrives. 

During last night's thunderstorm the KAGI tower in Grants Pass was struck by lightning damaging a main component of the KAGI transmitter.  We're assessing the damage today and will work as quickly as possible to repair the problem.  

Dean Rea/oregonhiking.com

There may be few hikers as dedicated as William L. Sullivan

Even better, few hikers who write as prolifically about hiking as Sullivan.  He's a fifth-generation Oregonian who loves to trek around the state on foot. 

And he's written 18 books and a pile of articles about the places he's seen, and is now revisiting previous hike sites to update his writing. 

State Department/Public Domain

It may not be a career for everyone, but working in the Foreign Service agrees with Lewis Lukens

He joined the State Department in the footsteps of his father, almost literally.  Lukens arrived in Senegal as U.S. Ambassador decades after his father worked in the embassy there. 

Lukens's job is now outreach and recruiting people interested in careers in the Foreign Service. 

Nobody currently alive was around at the time of the Big Bang, so far as we know.  So we go to science with the scientists we have. 

Fortunately, those include Caltech cosmologist and theoretical physicist Sean Carroll... he's got the science chops PLUS the Ted-talk friendly manner to communicate what he's learned. 

Which he puts on paper in a new book called The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself

lostcoastoutpost.com / Oliver Cory

Forty-four tons of trash, three shipping containers stuffed with people’s personal belongings, and close to 150 humans: all were removed from Palco Marsh in Eureka by the city's police this week. 

  Eleven former residents of the marsh are suing the city in federal court over the eviction. Attorney Shelley Mack is representing the group, known as the Palco 11. 

Wikimedia.com

Listeners take stage on our weekly VENTSday segment, a chance to vent on a couple of topics in the news--by phone, by email, or through our online survey. We provide the topics, you provide the opinions. 

  Topic 1: Voting by mail. If you're in Oregon, is there ANYTHING you miss about voting in polling-place elections on election day? If you're in California, is there any advantage to maintaining polling places for elections?

Topic 2: Do you support police action to evict homeless people from public places? 

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