News

Restore Oregon

Before the multiplex with the dozen-or-more smallish movies screens, we had big theaters downtown.

Medford's a great example: the historic Craterian got a major renovation 20 years ago, and the Holly is set for a major reworking. 

People like old theaters, especially when they are made to look new again.  Restore Oregon is holding a series of theater restoration workshops around the state. 

Randy McKay, boss of the Holly project, visits with details of the workshop and an update on his project. 

Toxic Algae Advisory Expanded To Agency, Upper Klamath Lakes

Jul 11, 2016
Christina Belasco/OPB

 

The health advisory for toxic blue-green algae issued June 24 for Howards Bay in Upper Klamath Lake has been updated to include all of Agency and Upper Klamath lakes, according to a news release from the Oregon Health Authority.

University of California-Davis

You've probably got a list of animals you'd never think about hurting.  But what if those animals were crowding out other animals you valued? 

That is the ethical issue faced by the people manage the curbing or removal of invasive species. 

Like the Tui Chub, a fish in Diamond Lake that has crowded out sport fish in the past, leading wildlife managers to poison the lake to kill all the fish (and later re-stock). 

Joseph Tuminello studies this kind of ethical dilemma in his doctoral research in Texas. 

Stephen DeVight/WSDOT

Passenger trains are one of the more environmentally-friendly ways of moving people between cities. With that in mind, Oregon and Washington have invested nearly a billion dollars in operating and improving the Amtrak Cascades rail line since it was launched in 1993. The line runs between Eugene, Oregon and Vancouver, Canada.

Now, a federal agency is floating proposals that opponents say could make the Northwest’s main passenger rail line run slower, later and less reliably. 

Jefferson Public Radio will co-sponsor the first debate scheduled between Oregon Governor Kate Brown and her Republican challenger, Dr. Bud Pierce.

The debate will be held on Sept. 24 in Bend, and will focus on rural issues in the state. Other media co-sponsors will include the East Oregonian newspaper and KTVZ television.

Frankie Fouganthin/Wikimedia

Mountain bikes are ubiquitous today, but nobody knew what one was a few decades ago. 

Enter Gary Fisher and a few other dedicated trail riders.  Fisher is often called "the father of the mountain bike" for his innovations. 

And Fisher is the subject of a new short film made by mountain bike dealer and lover Ron Hilbert

The film shows tonight (July 7) at Backside Brewing Company in Roseburg at an event sponsored by Umpqua Velo Club

Forest Service/Public Domain

Jumping out of a plane to fight a fire sounds like a military response. 

Funny you should mention it: the practice of smokejumping did, in fact, begin in the shadow of World War II. 

The war ended long ago, but the practice did not. 

Sometimes the best way to fight a fire in a remote area is by dropping people and equipment from a plane (with parachutes).  The Siskiyou Smokejumper Base Museum near Cave Junction lays out the history of smokejumpers. 

The pointer recently moved another click to the right: fire danger is now High in much of the region. 

It is now a question of when, not if, firefighters get busy keeping wildfires from growing out of control. 

The strategy involves heavy use of aircraft these days. 

The Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and Oregon Department of Forestry are among the agencies and jurisdictions that keep firefighters on standby for the ground and the air. 

Irrigation District Accused Of Cheating Oregon Farmers

Jul 5, 2016
Jeff Barnard/AP

Several growers in Northeast Oregon are accusing the Westland Irrigation District of cheating them out of water to benefit larger farms.

Wikimedia

Basic Rights Oregon works hard to ensure the rights of members of the LGBTQ community. 

And for nearly a decade, it has been counting gains in those rights, under the direction of Executive Director Jeana Frazzini. 

During Frazzini's tenure, LGBTQ people racked up victories in a number of policy areas, all the way up to marriage equality. 

Frazzini steps down from her role at BRO in a matter of days. 

Victor M. Vicente Selvas/Wikimedia

Irrigation is not a new idea, but farmers in our region once got through the growing season without it. 

Dryland farming, it's called; and it requires careful choices in crops and careful conservation of water. 

Dryland farming is still practiced at the Hanley Farm of the Southern Oregon Historical Society.  It involves a LOT of mulch. 

Hanley Farm Agricultural Manager Rion Glynn visits with details of the work... and the results.  
 

Benjamin Esham/Wikimedia

July is here, and independence celebrations abound!  We add fireworks shows to the entertainment list with this month's First Friday segment. 

Any Friday is something of an event. First Friday is a slightly bigger deal in the arts world, as several communities in our region observe First Friday Art Walks. 

The Exchange goes with the flow, with our monthly First Friday Arts segment. 

We open the phone lines (800-838-3760) and invite arts organizations from throughout the listening area to call in with details of arts events in the coming weeks... from fine art to open mike nights, all arts events are fair game. 

It helps that the word "mural" is the same in Spanish. 

Because Ashland unveiled a new one this week, on the pedestrian walkway known as Calle Guanajuato. 

The  name comes from Ashland's sister city in Mexico, which also provided the mural painter. 

Laura Rangel Villaseñor--she prefers Loreta--came north to work on the project and see its unveiling. 

Nature Conservancy

Last year was the most expensive wildfire season ever. Federal agencies alone spent more than $2 billion on suppressing fires in 2015 and an estimated 2,500 homes were lost. This trend has been on the rise since the mid-1990s and continues to pick up steam.               

Is there any end in sight?

Featured Works for July – First Concert
(*Indicates July birthday)

July 1 F George Frideric Handel: Concerto Grosso in F major
 

July 4 M Barbara Harbach: Freedom Suite
July 5 T Paul Ben-Haim*: Three Songs Without Words
July 6 W Camille Saint-Saëns: Cello Sonata 
July 7 T Gustav Mahler*: Songs of a Wayfarer 
July 8 F George Antheil*: Valentine Waltzes 

thor/wikimedia

Blueberries taste good, especially between layers of sweet, flaky pastry. 

Pardon the pie reverie; now down to the science. 

Karen Avinelis is a blueberry grower, and has learned a few things about coaxing the fruit to deliver taste and nutrition. 

luminare press

Eugene is now home to about five times as many people as it held in 1950. 

"Leaps and bounds" might be an understatement when it comes to growth. 

Sara Jeanne Duncan Widness remembers the quiet days, and shares her memories in her book The Dusky Afternoon

Wikimedia

There's no place like home, but home is looking different over time. 

Oregon and California are both home to unique flora and fauna, and the flora is displaying notable changes. 

Susan Harrison from the University of California-Davis studies plant diversity, and she notices less of that diversity as drought and climate change take root in the region. 

Wikimedia

We've been learning of late what happens when there's an even number of Supreme Court justices. 

When there's a tie, a lower court ruling stands.  And stand it did, in the case brought by Texas against President Obama's executive action to protect some undocumented immigrants from deportation. 

Which means deportation is now a stronger possibility for people who hoped to be able to stay in the country. 

Immigration lawyer John Almaguer is well-versed in the nuances of the laws now on the books. 

We continue our discussion of immigration into VENTSday, through the lens of the Supreme Court decision and the UK's departure from the EU.

Give us your thoughts on how, if at all, immigration should be handled differently. 

Topic two: Legal marijuana in Oregon reaches its first birthday; we want your impressions of success, failure, or meh?   

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey online (see below), and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

The topics can range from presidential politics to how you spend your days off. Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

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