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RCC

The heart of downtown Medford owes much of its current look and configuration to the presence of Rogue Community College

RCC continues to demonstrate its value to the community--in this case, both Jackson and Josephine counties--in multiple ways.  And a (relatively) new leader is in charge. 

Cathy Kemper-Pelle took the reins of RCC as president over the summer. 

Alfie 66/Wikimedia

It is possible that one in seven American children have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder? 

Because that's how many are diagnosed, and it is an issue that continues to roil physicians, mental health experts, schools... and parents. 

Alan Schwarz steps into the debate with ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic.  He comes to the issue with no axe to grind, but a long career as an investigative reporter, now with the New York Times. 

Jack Ohman took his considerable skills in art and satire right past us. 

He was the Oregonian's political cartoonist for years, then skipped to the Sacramento Bee

We've admired his cartoons for decades, even the ones that didn't make the wolf OR-7 look so darned cute. 

River Roots Productions

It looks like craziness to the non-kayaker, but people DO paddle kayaks over waterfalls.  Though... generally not NIAGARA Falls. 

And yet a kayaker planned just such a suicide event, as documented by kayaker/filmmaker Rush Sturges in a movie called "Chasing Niagara."

Did we mention that taking vessels over Niagara Falls is illegal?  That's one of many revelations in the movie, showing at the Jefferson State Flixx Fest in Sturges' native Scott Valley (September 22-25). 

Stories Alive

One way to get kids interested in reading and literacy is to present THEIR stories. 

That is the approach of Stories Alive, based in Ashland. 

Stories that children create get polished and told and even staged by professional performers.  It brings their stories to life--hence the name of the organization. 

Courtesy ACPC

The nearest shooting war is thousands of miles away, but we can think about peace in our own communities. 

As a regular, ongoing part of the culture.  That is the idea behind the Ashland Culture of Peace Commission

The CPC aims to incorporate a culture of peace into Ashland city business and society. 

KellyB/Mandarin Restaurant/Wikimedia

No matter how hard we try, we can't quite get our food to taste like it does in a restaurant.  What's missing? 

Well, salt, maybe, but the list has got to be longer than that. 

We get some kitchen insider knowledge from a couple of people who make their livings making food for others.  Billy Buscher is the chef at Alchemy in Ashland, Melissa McMillan works at Sammich and Pastrami Zombie. 

Update:  Wednesday, 9/21 -- Work at Brookings was completed and we're now broadcasting at 101.7FM. The new translator is operating well but will undergo additional improvements in the coming weeks.

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US Geological Survey

Gaze across the mountains of the Northwest these days and you may notice an unusual number of dead firs, pines and other conifer trees scattered among the green ones. Drought is usually considered the prime culprit. But recent research suggests the damage that has historically been done to conifer forests by routine dry spells is being compounded by climate change.

Les Zaitz Twitter Feed

Les Zaitz started working for the Oregonian when wire service printers still went clickety-clack all day and all night. 

He will finish his career with the Oregonian at a time when investigators spend much of their time poring over emails (when public agencies release them). 

Zaitz covered the eruption of Mt. St. Helens, the arrival (and departure) of the Rajneeshes in Eastern Oregon, and the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge takeover, to name just few. 

California's hospital fee program and drug prices are both items up for votes on the November ballot. 

We start there and broaden out a discussion of health care on this week's VENTSday... seeking your own story about accessing health care or grading its quality. 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a topic on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday. Join by phone at 800-838-3760, email JX@jeffnet.org, or take the survey online. You can ALSO record a phone message in advance, at 541-552-6331.

CCD Business Development Corp.

The City of Coos Bay, like a lot of cities, needs to update its infrastructure. 

The city's wastewater treatment plant--yep, sewage and all the rest--needs an upgrade.  Specifically, plant number two (we are not making this up) is due for replacement. 

And some city council members want to consider privatizing the wastewater treatment process, something few other cities have done. 

Andrew Sheeler covers the issue for The World in Coos Bay. 

Oregon Community Foundation

Latinos are growing as a portion of Oregon society. 

They now make up 12 percent of the population, but nearly a quarter of the K-12 school population. 

The Oregon Community Foundation tracks numbers and issues for this community in a report called "Latinos in Oregon: Trends and Opportunities in a Changing State." 

Exploring Historic Shipwrecks Off California’s Redwood Coast

Sep 10, 2016
Fort Ross Conservancy

Along the old redwood logging ports off the northern California coast, lie the remains of many shipwrecks from the 19th and early 20th centuries. For the California Report, Danielle Venton went out with marine archaeologists mapping the wrecks.

The constant debates about what's wrong with the American immigration system make you wonder when it was right--if ever.

Political Scientist Dan Tichenor at the University of Oregon can take us back into the history of immigration law.  And he will, when he visits The Exchange with the first installment in what we envision as a continuing series highlighting research at the U of O. 

We call it CURIOUS/Research Meets Radio--with capital U and O. 

Mari C Shanta / via Facebook

It is one of the great fears of our time and place: that a huge fire will blow through our community, destroying our homes. 

It has even come true, sadly, in Weed and other towns.  Can we prevent huge and destructive "megafires"? 

Paul Hessburg, who works for the Forest Service and the University of Washington, thinks so.  He is the presenter of a traveling multimedia exhibit called "Era of Megafires" now visiting towns in the West. 

Crater Lake Institute

Crater Lake is pretty and placid now, but it was born of violence: the eruption of what we call Mount Mazama. 

People lived in the region back then, and evidence of their habitation was buried under volcanic ash in Western Oregon valleys. 

University of Oregon researcher Brian O'Neill has been digging under the ash, uncovering clues to the people who lived in the land when Mazama was just a tall mountain. 

Southern Oregon University

Linda Schott had to travel a long way to become the president of Southern Oregon University

All the way from Maine, in fact, where she was president of the University of Maine at Presque Isle. 

She is the first permanent (as in not interim) president at SOU in two years, and the first since the centralized public higher education system in Oregon broke up in favor of more local control. 

Camp of the Sacred Stones Facebook page

The Klamath Tribes in south central Oregon have joined several others in the Northwest in supporting a tribe fighting an oil pipeline being built in North Dakota. 

California’s Quiet Senate Race

Sep 7, 2016
Susanica Tam/KPCC

As California voters move closer to the general election, a new poll finds 25 percent of those surveyed remain undecided on the state's U.S. Senate race, a contest that's failed to break through the tidal wave of coverage for the presidential campaign.

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