EarthFix Northwest Environmental News

North Portland Residents Complain Of Flawed Air Testing

Jun 21, 2016

North Portland residents say state air testing in their neighborhood was flawed and doesn’t address their longstanding concerns about strong paint odors.

Neighbors of the Swan Island industrial area voiced their complaints Monday night at a forum at the University of Portland.

A crisp wind rakes the surface of Hood Canal, a narrow, 68-mile waterway and Puget Sound’s westernmost reach.

A group of divers emerges from the chop and wades ashore. They’ve just finished their first open-water dive.

“Congratulations. You’re certified,” said Callie Renfro, the dive instructor.

More NW E-Waste Recyclers Found Exporting

Jun 19, 2016

Businesses in Washington state's e-waste recycling program haven't been properly recycling all of the old electronics they collect, a Seattle-based watchdog group said Monday.

The non-profit Basel Action Network found that three Pacific Northwest recyclers shipped non-working electronics to China, despite pledges to recycle them responsibly in the state. The businesses are registered as approved recyclers through Washington state's electronics takeback program.

Mike Matheny’s daughter stood on tiptoes while hoisting a sign in the air behind a group of protesters blocking train tracks in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday.

Police arrested 21 people who refused to vacate the tracks as they protested oil train activity in the Pacific Northwest.

Over the last several days, Oregon transportation officials have provided not only a clearer understanding of what may have led to this month’s oil train derailment in the Columbia River Gorge, but also the rigorous level of safety checks they say were performed just weeks before 16 cars left the tracks in Mosier, causing a riverside inferno.

Oregon officials said the tracks were inspected on April 27, just weeks before the June 3 derailment, using methods designed to ensure the tracks were safe enough to carry crude oil trains.

In an unusual sign of tension between two of Oregon’s most powerful Democratic officeholders, U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio wrote a blistering letter to Gov. Kate Brown saying she appeared to mislead him on a controversial environmental issue.

DeFazio is a key congressional champion of recovering wolf populations that were once hunted to the point of extinction. In his June 9 letter, he criticized Brown and her staff for the way they handled a bill in the Oregon Legislature that could weaken protections for wolves.

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Just after noon on June 3, the two-man Union Pacific crew hauling 96 cars of Tacoma-bound crude oil felt a tug on the train as they passed through the Columbia River Gorge.

The train’s emergency brakes triggered unexpectedly, according to railroad union leaders, indicating bad track or equipment failure could be to blame. The crew looked back and saw smoke — the beginnings of a fire that would burn for much of the night.

It’s been an unseasonably warm June week at Oregon’s Diamond Lake.

This makes for some lovely fishing weather, but it’s not ideal for fish stocking. And that’s what a small group of employees with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are here for.

“As soon as Greg gives me the word, I’ll dump ‘em in,” says the fish deliveryman.

The thousands of fish traveled via small trailer through the night from a hatchery in Utah. The driver arrived about two hours early in an attempt to beat the heat.

Eugene Schools Find Lead In Water

Jun 14, 2016

The Eugene School District said Monday it found elevated lead levels in the water at four separate schools.

The elevated lead was found in one or more water faucets at Kennedy Middle School, Roosevelt Middle School, Sheldon High School and the district office.

According to the district, it announced the initial test results for Kennedy Middle School last week, but the lead level results for other campuses are new.

An environmental testing firm is confirming the results.

The state of Oregon is delaying a decision on two permits submitted by the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas export terminal and pipeline project. The Oregon Department of State Lands says it will take another five months to make a decision.

Native Olympia oysters have a built-in resistance to ocean acidification, according to a newly published study in the Journal of Limnology and Oceanography.

Native Olympia oysters are smaller than the larger, faster-growing Pacific oysters preferred by farmers.

But a study by Oregon State University professor George Waldbusser has found Olympia oysters make their shells much more slowly. And that helps protect them from acidic water, “Having that trait identified might give opportunity to actually breed that trait into some of the other commercial species," he said.

A year before 16 of its oil tanker cars derailed and caused a fire, a spill and an evacuation order in the Columbia River Gorge, Union Pacific lobbied against stronger oversight of oil trains moving through the Northwest.

The railroad industry lost in Washington. But in Oregon, it won.

Tribal leaders from around the Northwest gathered Thursday in Mosier, Oregon, not far from the site of last week’s oil train derailment in the Columbia River Gorge.

They prayed and spoke out against oil trains.

“We should not have any fossil fuels coming through our ancestral homeland, especially along the river," said Austin Greene, the tribal chairman for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

The number of people in Portland testing their water for lead has spiked dramatically this month.

In a typical year, the Portland Water Bureau sends out about 3,000 kits to customers who want to test their drinking water for lead. But in the first nine days of June alone, the water bureau has received 1,500 requests for test kits. And that’s on top of roughly 2,900 kits the water agency sent between January and May.

“It’s been quiet a significant increase for us this year," said Scott Bradway, who manages lead hazard reduction efforts at the Portland Water Bureau.

A 1,900 acre fire near Lake Billy Chinook continues to threaten more than 900 homes. Officials said the fire is 30 percent contained.

The Akawana fire is within a few miles of a subdivision northeast of Sisters in Jefferson County, and it's triggered a preliminary evacuation notice for residents. Residents in the area have been asked to be ready to leave at a moment’s notice.

The lighting-caused blaze is currently burning in heavy brush and ponderosa pine on state forestland.

The U.S. Forest Service has released the data that kicked off concerns about Oregon’s system of monitoring air quality and air toxics in Portland. Hundreds of readings gathered all around the city are expressed on an interactive map that shows readings taken in 2013.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will take 30 years and around $746 million to clean up a 10-mile stretch of the Willamette River known as the Portland Harbor Superfund Site.

The area from the Broadway Bridge to the Columbia Slough is highly contaminated from more than a century of industrial use. After 16 years of study, the EPA finally has a plan for how to clean it all up.

The Bend Parks and Recreation Board has passed a memorandum of understanding about the future of Mirror Pond under new, potential private ownership of the Mirror Pond dam.

The non-binding MOU outlines future collaboration between the district and Mirror Pond Solutions, a corporation owned by local developer Bill Smith and construction company owner Todd Taylor.

Mirror Pond Solutions wants to lead negotiations with Pacific Power, owner and operator of Mirror Pond dam, and explore purchasing the structure.

Railroad industry experts are questioning the early explanation from Union Pacific for why its oil train crashed in Mosier, Ore.

Union Pacific said the preliminary indications from its investigation are “the failure of a fastener that connects the rail to the railroad tie,” according Justin Jacobs, a railroad spokesman.

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