Earthfix Northwest Environmental News

Earthfix
4:17 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

What Does The Plymouth Explosion Mean For LNG Proposals?

Duane VanBeek tells Plymouth residents that the evacuation zone had been reduced to one mile. An explosion at an LNG storage tank forced them from their homes Monday morning. Many returned home after spending the day at the Umatilla County Fairgrounds.
Courtney Flatt

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 4:18 pm

People opposed to exporting liquefied natural gas in Oregon say Monday’s explosion along the Columbia River points out safety problems at these types of facilities. But project supporters say the explosion should not affect decisions about their facilities.

The explosion at a liquefied natural gas -- or LNG -- storage tank in Plymouth, Wash., sent five people to the hospital. Hundreds more were forced to evacuate a two-mile zone around the facility.

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NPR Story
4:00 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Landslide Mapping An Unfinished Task for Geologists

An excavator working in the debris field near Oso, Wash., where a mudslide destroyed a neighborhood in March. The death toll reached 28 as of April 2.
WSP https://www.flickr.com/photos/snoco/13455469653/

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 4:02 pm

The last time the U.S. Geological Survey made a national map of landslide hazards, it did so on paper. It didn’t use laser imaging for landslide detection and it didn’t render the maps with high-powered geographic software near-universally used in today’s maps.

It didn’t use these things because they didn't exist. It was 1982.

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NPR Story
5:28 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Court Orders Agencies To Consider Fewer Hatchery Fish For The Elwha

In this 2011 photo, Lower Elwha Hatchery Manager Larry Ward feeds the steelhead and coho that are being raised in a hatchery for introduction to the Elwha.
Katie Campbell

A judge has ordered federal agencies to reconsider the number of planned hatchery fish releases into the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula

As crews finish the largest dam removal in history on the Elwha, managers are working to restore fish runs above the dam sites. Their plan includes releasing more than 7 million hatchery salmon and steelhead into the river.

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Earthfix
4:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Oregon Company Defies State Order To Stop Work In Salmonberry River

A company that's rebuilding sections of the Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad says it doesn't need a state permit to work on the Salmonberry River.

The state of Oregon has ordered a company to stop rebuilding sections of the Port of Tillamook Bay railroad because it doesn't have a permit to put material into the nearby river.

But the company isn't stopping and says it doesn't need a state permit.

Many sections of the Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad washed into the Salmonberry River in a 2007 storm. The railroad has been out of commission since the washout.

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Earthfix
4:05 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Oregon Regulators Issue $117,000 Fine For Oil Terminal's Permit Violation

A company that's rebuilding sections of the Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad says it doesn't need a state permit to work on the Salmonberry River.

Oregon environmental regulators imposed an unusually big fine this week against a crude oil terminal on the Columbia River that violated its air quality permit.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality issued the $117,000 fine to the Columbia Pacific Bio-Refinery in Clastkanie, Ore., after the facility handled 300 million gallons of crude oil in 2013. Its permit was for 50 million gallons.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

U.S.-China Talks On Shellfish Ban Lead To New Testing For Contaminants

A geoduck clam from Puget Sound. China's ban on importing such shellfish remains in place, but recent U.S.-China talks have led to plans for a new testing protocol to ensure food safety.
Katie Campbell

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:15 am

U.S. officials say they will develop a new testing protocol to detect certain contaminants in shellfish, following their meeting with the Chinese government to discuss an end to that country's ban on importing shellfish from most of the U.S. West Coast.

U.S. officials said during a briefing with reporters Friday that the Chinese are satisfied with U.S. testing methods for paralytic shellfish poisoning but they’re still concerned about arsenic. High concentrations of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, were found in the skin of geoduck harvested near Tacoma, Wash., last fall.

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Environment
10:06 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Would Oregon Forestry Rules Have Stopped Logging Above The Oso Landslide?

The slide area where Saturday's deadly landslide occurred in Oso, Wash. Washington allowed logging with restriction prior to the slide. Oregon does not restrict logging on this particular type of landslide-prone terrain.
Snohomish County

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:41 pm

After heavy rains triggered fatal landslides in 1996, Oregon rewrote its rules on where logging can happen in landslide-prone areas.

Oregon forestry rules now say you can't log in areas with where logging could trigger a public safety risk from a certain type of landslide. But it's not the type of landslide that devastated Oso, Wash. It's the kind that killed people in Oregon back in 1996.

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Earthfix
4:51 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Fish-Eating Birds To Be Killed At 5 Dams

The double-crested cormorant. It's one of three types of bird that will be shot if non-lethal hazing fails to stop them from eating juvenile salmon and steelhead at five dams on the Columbia and lower Snake rivers.
Vince Patton/OPB

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 4:30 pm

Operators of five dams on the Columbia and lower Snake rivers will start killing birds that eat migrating juvenile salmon.

The measures are meant to protect endangered salmon and steelhead as they begin their journey out to sea. This is the first time in 20 years that dam managers say they have had to kill what they call nuisance birds at the dams.

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NPR Story
2:35 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Landside Expert: More Mapping, Better Insurance Needed In The Northwest

Rubble at one of the destroyed homesites in Oso, Wash. following Saturday's deadly landslide. Landslide expert and geologist Scott Burns says it's rare and expensive for homeowners to have insurance against losses that result from landslides.
Snohomish County

Landslide expert and Portland State University geologist Scott Burns spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on Wednesday during the daily talk show The Record. Burns talked about the challenges to obtain landslide insurance in the Northwest and a New Zealand insurance model that could provide better coverage.

Sillman: Where in Washington state do we have good landslide maps?

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NPR Story
9:50 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Concern Over Landslide-Logging Connection Near Oso Is Decades Old

WSDOT photo of Oso slide area annotated by retired fisheries biologist Bill McMillan of Concrete, Wash.
Courtesy of WSDOT / Bill McMillan

Saturday's deadly slide was the latest in a long string of landslides to hit the area known as the Hazel or Oso slide along the North Fork Stillaguamish River.

State and tribal officials have known about and tried to block landslides on that spot for half a century.

Despite the known hazards, the slopes above the slide area have been clearcut multiple times.

Clearcutting is known to aggravate the risk of deep-seated landslides like the one that destroyed Steelhead Drive neighborhood in Oso, Wash., on Saturday.

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