Earthfix Northwest Environmental News

NPR Story
7:03 am
Tue July 1, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Is There Hope For Salmon In Northwest Cities?

Alan Yeakley is the director of the School of the Environment at Portland State University and co-author of Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest.
Courtesy of Portland State University

Swimming through cities is a fact of life for many salmon in the Northwest. With all their pavement and pollution, cities add to the challenges salmon face as they make their way to the ocean and back to their spawning grounds.

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NPR Story
7:03 am
Tue July 1, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Is There Hope For Salmon In Northwest Cities?

Alan Yeakley is the director of the School of the Environment at Portland State University and co-author of Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest.
Courtesy of Portland State University

Swimming through cities is a fact of life for many salmon in the Northwest. With all their pavement and pollution, cities add to the challenges salmon face as they make their way to the ocean and back to their spawning grounds.

Read more
NPR Story
7:03 am
Tue July 1, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Is There Hope For Salmon In Northwest Cities?

Alan Yeakley is the director of the School of the Environment at Portland State University and co-author of Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest.
Courtesy of Portland State University

Swimming through cities is a fact of life for many salmon in the Northwest. With all their pavement and pollution, cities add to the challenges salmon face as they make their way to the ocean and back to their spawning grounds.

Read more
NPR Story
7:03 am
Tue July 1, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Is There Hope For Salmon In Northwest Cities?

Alan Yeakley is the director of the School of the Environment at Portland State University and co-author of Wild Salmonids in the Urbanizing Pacific Northwest.
Courtesy of Portland State University

Swimming through cities is a fact of life for many salmon in the Northwest. With all their pavement and pollution, cities add to the challenges salmon face as they make their way to the ocean and back to their spawning grounds.

Read more
NPR Story
5:59 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Obama Signs Northwest Lawmaker's Bill For Toxic Algae Research

Algae blooms in Puget Sound, photographed from a research plane. These blooms of algae eventually sink to the bottom and decompose, releasing CO2 which makes the water more acidic.
Ashley Ahearn

A Northwest lawmaker's battle against toxic algae blooms won the support of President Barack Obama Monday, when he signed into law a bill aimed at controlling such outbreaks.

Oregon congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and Florida Sen. Bill Nelson co-sponsored the bill, which authorizes $82 million dollars for new research meant to control toxic algae blooms nationwide.

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Klamath Water Woes
5:21 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Could An Alliance Of Tribes And Farmers Solve Klamath’s Water Woes?

The Klamath Basin spans northern California and southern Oregon and has seen frequent water crises between the farming, ranching, tribal and environmental communities.
Devan Schwartz

A second straight year of water shutoffs in the arid Klamath Basin is drying up ranchland and forcing many ranchers to sell their cattle early.

But the water woes have created an unlikely alliance that could lead to a historic solution.

Scott White is the Klamath Basin watermaster. He has the difficult task of telling ranchers to turn off the water they use for cattle and crops.

“It was probably one of the hardest things that I’ve ever had to do – it was a terrible feeling,” said White.

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NPR Story
4:21 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Appeals Board Finds Bias, Orders County To Re-Vote On LNG Pipeline

A proposal to build a liquefied natural gas (LNG) pipeline in northwestern Oregon will get another vote by Clatsop County commissioners, following a recent state appeals board ruling.
Flickr Creative Commons

The Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals says Clatsop County will have to vote again on a controversial liquefied natural gas pipeline after determining one of its commissioners was biased against the project.

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EarthFix
4:00 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Scientists Close In On What’s Killing Sea Stars

An ochre star's arm dangles by a thread, one of the signs of sea star wasting syndrome.
Katie Campbell

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:00 am

ORCAS ISLAND, Wash. -- Drew Harvell peers into the nooks and crannies along the rocky shoreline of Eastsound on Orcas Island. Purple and orange starfish clutch the rocks, as if hanging on for dear life.

Watch the video:

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NPR Story
9:08 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Report: Urgent Recommendations For Tesoro Refinery Safety Were Suppressed

Tesoro's Anacortes oil refinery in May.
John Ryan / KUOW

In the months following a deadly refinery explosion in Anacortes, Washington, in April 2010, federal investigators with the U.S. Chemical Safety Board were ready to issue urgent safety recommendations. But management at the agency blocked the release of their urgent alert.

It then took the Chemical Safety Board another three and a half years to issue recommendations for making the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes safer.

Those are some of the scathing conclusions of a Congressional inquiry into mismanagement at the Chemical Safety Board.

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NPR Story
1:00 am
Wed June 25, 2014

How Washington Is Working To Increase Latino Fishers

Valeria Quinones, left, fishes with her family, Daniel Guerra, Elizabeth Guerra, and Ricardo Quinones during a fishing event geared to get more Latino people fishing.
Courtney Flatt

WENTACHEE, Wash. -- About 150 people line the shoreline at the Beehive Reservoir in north central Washington. Spanish and English mix, as anglers plunk lures into the lake. And just as quickly as the lures sink to the bottom, rainbow trout bite down on the chartreuse-colored bait.

"You've got a bite," someone on the shoreline shouts.

The small reservoir is about a 20 minute drive from downtown Wenatchee. But Norma Gallegos said it’s a trip made by only a few of the city’s Hispanic residents.

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