Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

e Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland, and allowing parts of the ban that's now been on hold since March to take effect. The justices removed the lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of two...

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JPR Live Session: Lesley Kernochan

Lesley Kernochan is one you can’t predict. One minute she’s howling a country tune with the midnight coyotes, and the next minute she’s delivering a full plate of swingin’ sass. Lesley has an eclectic background as a saxophonist, contemporary composer, operatically trained coloratura, vagabond cabarista, musical saw player, and now singer/songwriter. In each uniquely crafted song Lesley offers her intimate vocal prowess and earnest, playful spirit.

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Department of Defense/Public Domain

50 Years (!) Since The Summer Of Love

You'll bum out a lot of older Americans when you point out that the "summer of love" was 50 years ago. It was an exciting and pivotal year in American history, and the year Danny Goldberg graduated from high school. He includes his own experiences and broadens the focus in his memoir, In Search of The Lost Chord: 1967 and the Hippie Idea . The music, the Vietnam War, the civil rights struggle and more are mixed in with personal memories of 1967 in the book.

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Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

In many ways, parenting newborns seems instinctual. We see a little baby, and we want to hold her. Snuggle and kiss her. Even just her smell seems magical. Many of us think breast-feeding is similar. "I had that idea before my first child was born," says Brooke Scelza , an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Los Angeles, California. "I definitely thought, 'Oh, I'm going to figure that out. Like how hard can it be?' " Although breast-feeding is easy for some women, for many new...

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How The Senate Health Care Bill Could Disrupt The Insurance Market

Senate Republicans have little margin for error as they prepare for a vote this coming week on a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act . Some lawmakers are already raising concerns that the bill could aggravate the problem of healthy people going without insurance, driving up costs for everyone else. "If you can get insurance after you get sick, you will," Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., told NBC's Today Show . "And without the individual mandate, that sort of adverse selection, the death...

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Oregon U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden accused Attorney General Jeff Sessions of stonewalling Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill.

“American’s don’t want to hear that answers to relevant questions are privileged and off-limits, or that they can’t be provided in public, or that it would be quote, 'inappropriate,' for witnesses to tell us what they know,” Wyden said in remarks before posing a series of questions to Sessions.

Medical Marijuana Sales In Oregon Plummeting As Recreational Sales Increase

Jun 13, 2017
Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Nicole Shaffer is a 25-year-old store receptionist. She’s been using medicinal pot for four years now.

“I use it mostly for kind of emotional stuff,” she said. “I probably … smoke about once a day at this point.”

But last month, Shaffer let her official Oregon medical marijuana card lapse. She said the annual $200 cost isn’t worth the savings she makes on medical versus recreational marijuana.

Picture of suction dredge.
Oregon Wild

Vacuum action on Oregon streams moves from temporarily banned to permanently prohibited.

Both state House and Senate have passed the Suction Dredge Reform Bill (SB 3), and Governor Kate Brown signed the bill on June 14th.

Long a project of the late Senator Alan Bates, the bill prohibits suction dredge mining in Oregon streams where it would disturb sensitive fish habitat, while allowing the practice in areas where it will do less harm.

kcmckell/Live Aloha

It's getting late in the Oregon legislature.  A budget is due when the fiscal year begins July 1st, and there's not enough money to pay for all existing programs.

So agencies large and small are still unsure about what their funding will be.  Large as in: all the school districts in the state. 

Small as in: the Farm to School program, which teaches kids about where food comes from AND provides local food to their cafeterias. 

One version of the budget would cut funding entirely, another would cut funding in half. 

willhornyak.net

The ancient tale of Scheherazade is about a storyteller. 

She saved her own life, and many more, by telling stories to a tyrannical king for a thousand nights. 

The story resonates with Portland storyteller Will Hornyak, who tells stories in prisons and many other venues, firmly believing that storytelling can change lives. 

A lawsuit was filed this week against a Lincoln County ordinance that was narrowly passed by voters last month. The suit challenges a ban to aerial pesticide spraying.

California Lawmakers Reach Deal On How To Spend Tobacco Tax Money

Jun 13, 2017
melfoody / Flickr

June 12, 7:19 p.m.: Democratic lawmakers have reached a deal with California Governor Jerry Brown over how to spend more than a billion dollars in Proposition 56 tobacco tax revenue.

It’s against the law in Oregon to knowingly or intentionally interfere with public transportation. On Monday, the state House passed a bill that would modify the criminal penalty for doing so. Bill supporters say those penalties disproportionately target the homeless and people with mental illness.

The city of Portland is joining a national effort to post climate change data that was removed from the website of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Visit the EPA’s current website, and you can find pages for topics including lead, pesticides and even bedbugs. But the main climate change page was taken down in April.

Gov. Jerry Brown releases his 2017-2018 budget proposal on Jan. 10, 2017.
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

California Senate Democrats Mike McGuire, Holly Mitchell, Richard Roth and Ricardo Lara discuss the California budget deal announced June 13, 2017, by Gov. Jerry Brown.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

UPDATE 5:14 p.m.: Governor Jerry Brown called the $125 billion general fund spending plan “balanced and progressive,” and Democratic lawmakers agreed.

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