Police Identify Suspect In London Attack Near Parliament; Death Toll Rises To 4

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52. Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and three civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday. (Two of the civilian victims died on Wednesday; the third was hospitalized after the attack and died Thursday....

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Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

Here's a classic big city dilemma (sorry suburban folks): It's late at night, the weather is bad, and you're hungry. Your favorite restaurant is less than a mile away, but you don't want to leave the house, and you don't want to pay a $5 delivery fee — plus tip — for a $10 meal. So, what do you do? Back in the old days, you would have braved the elements — or learned to plan ahead. But those days are coming to an end, at least in Washington, D.C. A fleet of about 20 autonomous, knee-high...

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ESO, http://www.eso.org/public/images/ann13075a

Exoplanets And What They're Like

We grew up thinking about people living on other planets, thanks to the likes of Superman and Star Wars. But planets outside of our solar system (and outside science fiction) were really just a theory until the 1990s. That's when telescopes and other detectors improved enough to find the first true "exoplanets." Now we know of thousands of them, and an overview is provided in Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System .

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Would You Become An Immortal Machine?

Picture this: You are in the bathroom, doing your usual thing after breakfast, when you notice blood in the water sitting in your white, porcelain toilet. Scared, you schedule an appointment with a gastroenterologist, who recommends a colonoscopy and a biopsy. It could be cancer, it could be a harmless colitis. But there you are, confronted, perhaps for the first time of your life, with your own mortality. You get to the doctor's office and are told to wait. Reading some glossy magazine to...

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Health Care Plan Championed By Trump Hurts Counties That Voted For Him

The Affordable Care Act replacement plan championed by President Trump would hurt low-income people in rural areas that voted heavily for the Republican last fall, according to an NPR analysis of data on proposed subsidy changes from the Kaiser Family Foundation . The new changes in tax credits and subsidies for older Americans are a big reason many Republicans are hesitant to get behind the American Health Care Act, which is set for a vote in the House on Thursday. A major component of the...

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Oregon Lawmakers Consider Making Tobacco Illegal Until Age 21

Mar 20, 2017

The campaign to increase the age for buying and using tobacco to 21 is moving around the nation.

California and Hawaii already have statewide laws and Oregon politicians are scheduled to consider the legislation this week.

Sharon Meieran is both an emergency room doctor and a commissioner with Multnomah County. She’s waiting for state legislators to act, and if they don’t, she says she’ll move forward with the idea locally.

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow Oregonians to once again vote for the state’s top education official.

Some Republicans Have Problems With The 'American Health Care Act'

Mar 17, 2017

Some Republican lawmakers in Oregon are joining Democrats in their displeasure at the replacement for the Affordable Care Act.

Oregon’s top Republican, Greg Walden, is shepherding the new American Health Care Act through Congress. He’s called it the first step in helping families obtain what he calls “truly affordable health care. But if passed, the Oregon Health Authority says hundreds of thousands of Oregonians would lose coverage.

The state of the salmon population in Idaho’s Snake River was the topic of a passionate discussion during a conference hosted by members of Idaho’s Nez Perce Indian tribe over the weekend.

commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=662527

Cass Ingram is a believer in marijuana as a healing agent. 

But there's room in his heart and in his osteopathic practice for other herbs, as well. 

Dr. Ingram wrote a book called "The Cannabis Cure," but recognizes its legal limitations.  So he also suggests the use of various herbs as remedies for various afflictions, things from hops to cinnamon. 

Wing-Chi Poon, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4503578

Sunshine Week leads us straight into spring, but it's really not about the sun shining in the sky. 

Sunshine Week celebrates openness in government--the metaphorical sun shining into the workings of the people's business. 

Every year, the celebrations are tempered by news of public records withheld or meetings held out of view of the media. 

Open Oregon and other groups monitor the state of government transparency in the state. 

Oregon farmers and veterinarians are speaking out against a bill in Salem that would make it illegal to give antibiotics to healthy farm animals.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration put new rules in place this year to reduce the amount of antibiotics being used by farmers.

Speaking at a public hearing, Charlie Fisher with the Oregon consumer group OSPIRG said stronger protections are needed.

The wet and cold winter may have been a doozy for urban Oregonians, but for farmers all that snow was good news.

"For agricultural users that means that we are expecting a full supply of irrigation water since most of our reservoirs are going to be filling or are nearly full by the end of the runoff season," said Mary Mellema, a hydrologist with the Bureau of Reclamation.

In Malheur County, for example, the Owyhee Reservoir is expected to be full for the first time in five years. The hearty snowpack also means that all regions of Oregon are now considered out of drought.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

At least seven Oregon school districts are working to keep their Native American mascots by getting the support of local tribes.

The Roseburg School Board is the latest to approve an agreement with a local tribe. Board members voted Wednesday to keep “Indians” as the Roseburg High School mascot and a feather as the main image. The agreement with the Cow Creek band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians would add curriculum on Native American history and include a tribal representative on the school board’s instruction committee.

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