Police Identify Suspect In London Attack Near Parliament; Death Toll Rises To 4

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52. Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and three civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday. (Two of the civilian victims died on Wednesday; the third was hospitalized after the attack and died Thursday....

Read More

Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

Here's a classic big city dilemma (sorry suburban folks): It's late at night, the weather is bad, and you're hungry. Your favorite restaurant is less than a mile away, but you don't want to leave the house, and you don't want to pay a $5 delivery fee — plus tip — for a $10 meal. So, what do you do? Back in the old days, you would have braved the elements — or learned to plan ahead. But those days are coming to an end, at least in Washington, D.C. A fleet of about 20 autonomous, knee-high...

Read More
ESO, http://www.eso.org/public/images/ann13075a

Exoplanets And What They're Like

We grew up thinking about people living on other planets, thanks to the likes of Superman and Star Wars. But planets outside of our solar system (and outside science fiction) were really just a theory until the 1990s. That's when telescopes and other detectors improved enough to find the first true "exoplanets." Now we know of thousands of them, and an overview is provided in Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System .

Read More

Would You Become An Immortal Machine?

Picture this: You are in the bathroom, doing your usual thing after breakfast, when you notice blood in the water sitting in your white, porcelain toilet. Scared, you schedule an appointment with a gastroenterologist, who recommends a colonoscopy and a biopsy. It could be cancer, it could be a harmless colitis. But there you are, confronted, perhaps for the first time of your life, with your own mortality. You get to the doctor's office and are told to wait. Reading some glossy magazine to...

Read More

Health Care Plan Championed By Trump Hurts Counties That Voted For Him

The Affordable Care Act replacement plan championed by President Trump would hurt low-income people in rural areas that voted heavily for the Republican last fall, according to an NPR analysis of data on proposed subsidy changes from the Kaiser Family Foundation . The new changes in tax credits and subsidies for older Americans are a big reason many Republicans are hesitant to get behind the American Health Care Act, which is set for a vote in the House on Thursday. A major component of the...

Read More

How do you dispose of an old totem pole? Fortunately, this is not a problem we regularly face. But a tall totem gifted by Seattle to its sister city in Japan renewed this question.

The Oregon State Bar is investigating whether Oregon’s former U.S. Attorney, Amanda Marshall, violated ethics rules during an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate.

Last month, the bar sent a series of questions to Marshall referencing a report by the Department of Justice’s Office of Inspector General.

Documents obtained by OPB show Marshall’s attorney, Allison Rhodes, responded in writing on March 17, denying Marshall intended to impede a federal investigation into her conduct.

State-issued identification doesn't meet federal security requirements, and Oregon lawmakers are floating an idea that would have Oregonians individually pay to fix the issue.

Beginning in 2018, states must comply with the REAL ID Act.

The federal law requires states to beef up the security of their identity documents in order to access federal facilities and pass through airport security.

Legislation Would Close Gaps Along Oregon Coast Trail

Mar 20, 2017
Zach Urness/Statesman Journal

Few pathways conjure up more conflicting emotions than the Oregon Coast Trail.

One moment you’re hiking to the top of a rocky headland and looking upon a vast sweep of ocean. The next you’re risking life and limb on the shoulder of Highway 101 as cars and trucks scream past a few feet away.

Oregon students would learn more about the history of ethnic and social minorities under a measure being considered by state lawmakers.

For three years, recreational pot has been legal in Colorado, but using it in public is still against the law. That will change this summer when pot clubs are slated to open.

A blinking "open" sign hangs on the outside of an old building in a dark industrial zone just outside the Denver city limits. When the front door opens, smoke billows out.

Inside is one of the state's few pot clubs, called iBake. Recently, members celebrated the anniversary of its opening.

Glassy-eyed patrons bounce off each other in the small space.

California May Leave Federal Flood Insurance Program And Go It Alone

Mar 20, 2017
Californbia Department of Water Resources

Massive storms and flooding in California this winter killed six people and caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage. Federal flood insurance will pay for a lot of the repair, but state water managers say in the future, they may not want federal flood insurance; it’s not worth it. Now, California could become the first state in the nation to dump federal flood insurance and go it alone.

Desiree Kane, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51417472

The Lakota people of the Standing Rock Reservation put up spirited fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), but President Trump's executive order cleared the way for the pipeline's completion, and oil may be flowing through it now.

The Lakota People's Law Project worked on DAPL protest issues, including on behalf of the 800 or so people arrested.

Project attorneys work on behalf of the tribe and its interests, and the team includes Daniel Sheehan, a veteran of high-profile cases, including representing the New York Times in the Pentagon Papers case. 

Oregon State Parks Seek More Rangers, Money As Crowds Continue To Grow

Mar 20, 2017
Bryan M. Vance/OPB

The number of people visiting Oregon’s state parks has skyrocketed during the past decade, hitting a record 51 million visits in 2016.

But the number of park rangers hasn’t changed much during the same period, officials said, leading to challenges in keeping parks clean and facilities up to date.

On the third floor of the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, or PICA, a group of men and women are huddled around a table, buried in their laptops.

They’re part of a massive editing session to create more diverse voices and content on Wikipedia, with a focus on women artists.

A study by the Wikipedia Foundation found fewer than 10 percent of site editors on the open-source website were female.

Pages

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at: 800-838-3760 or email JX@jeffnet.org.   …

Job Opening

Jefferson Exchange Producer

Nikki Lane

JPR Live Session
Friday March 31st | Noon

Sleazy Listening With Ed Polish

April Fool's Day Special
Rhythm & News Service
March 31st | 10pm

Väsen

One World Concert
April 19th | 8pm
SOU Music Recital Hall

Agnes Obel

JPR Live Session
Friday April 7th | Noon

Unpacking Trump's Tweets

NPR's Context and Analysis

Service Alerts

Around Listening Area

Regional Zone Forecasts + ODOT & CalTrans Roadcams

Turn Your Old Car Into
The Programs You Love!

Stories Alive!

New Podcast From JPR

Ashland Fiber Network + DSL & A Distinguished Email Address

Brookings Change

C&N Now at 101.7FM

The JPR Studio Project

Creating A New Home For JPR On The SOU Campus

Features & Columns From
The JPR Members' Magazine

New Thinking On Big Ideas ...

For The Pacific Northwest